speak of the devil

(redirected from of the devil)

speak of the devil (and in he walks),

 and Talk of the devil (and he is sure to appear).
Prov. Talk about a certain person, and that person appears. (Used when someone appears whom you have just been talking about.) Alan: I haven't seen Bob for weeks. Jane: Look, here comes Bob right now. Alan: Well, talk of the devil. Hi, there. We were just talking about you. speak of the devil and in he walks.
See also: devil, of, speak

speak of the devil

(spoken)
the person we are talking about has just arrived Well, speak of the devil, here's Patrick now.
See also: devil, of, speak

speak/talk of the devil

  (humorous)
something that you say when a person you are talking about arrives and you are not expecting them Apparently, Lisa went there and wasn't very impressed - oh, talk of the devil, here she is.
See also: devil, of, speak

speak of the devil

The person just mentioned has appeared, as in Why, speak of the devil-there's Jeannie. This expression is a shortening of the older Speak of the devil and he's sure to appear, based on the superstition that pronouncing the devil's name will cause his arrival on the scene. The figurative use was already explained in James Kelly's Scottish Proverbs (1721).
See also: devil, of, speak

speak of the devil

in. said when someone whose name has just been mentioned appears or is heard from. (Cliché.) And speak of the devil, here’s Ted now.
See also: devil, of, speak

speak of the devil

Acknowledgment of someone's unexpected arrival. The complete expression is “speak of the devil and he will appear,” which is nothing that superstitious people wanted to have happen. As such a cautionary tale, the expression was not used in jest until the late 19th century. That's when responding to an unanticipated appearance with “speak of the devil” lost its dark satanic connotation.
See also: devil, of, speak
References in classic literature ?
Agno, chief of the devil devil doctors, had stumbled across him on the beach, and, despite the protestations of the boy who claimed him as personal trove, had ordered him to the canoe house.
Long flourish the sandal, the cord, and the cope, The dread of the devil and trust of the Pope; For to gather life's roses, unscathed by the briar, Is granted alone to the Barefooted Friar.
And, talking of the devil, Holy Clerk, are you not afraid that he may pay you a visit daring some of your uncanonical pastimes?
You'd find something good to say of the devil himself, Jim Boyd.
But no, Cornelia, I've nothing good to say of the devil.
But speaking of the devil, I am positive that Billy Booth is possessed by him now.
By the mercy of the devil," retorted Joannes Frollo, "these four hours and more; and I hope that they will be reckoned to my credit in purgatory.
The Devil & Demon Strategy is a brand new way of thinking at a time when content creation needs to manage and leverage big data files, such as 4K," said Ted Schilowitz, president of The Devil & Demon Strategy.
He shows her a rare 15th century Visconti tarot deck, from which the card of the Devil is missing--just as it is missing from every other known copy of the ancient deck.
These words and the words from Scripture give Jesus strength as he resists the temptations of the devil.
Dendle's critical focus is narratology, specifically the narrative construction of the devil, which leads him to "approach the texts in terms of internal narrative logic, therefore, attempting to reconstruct the scenes and actions as far as they are explicitly described" (5).
When magic works, it is always the work of the devil.
The popularity of the idea of the devil has waxed and waned through the ages.
We have already reflected upon the manner in which blues texts and blues praxis challenge the presuppositions of fallenness and transcendent justice, but it remains to briefly examine the celebration of the devil and hell in blues mythology.
In a fascinating little book entitled The Origin of Satan (Random House, 1995), Pagels, a religious historian and scholar of note, takes a long hard look at how the notion of Satan developed in biblical and Christian literature and concludes that often the idea of the devil was used by Christians as a way of beating up on their opponents.