of consequence


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of consequence

Important, as in For all matters of consequence we have to consult the board, or Only scientists of consequence have been invited to speak. This idiom was first recorded in 1489.
See also: consequence, of
References in periodicals archive ?
May 11, 2010) (stating in dicta that failure to advise defendant of consequence of civil commitment as a result of plea cannot be ineffective under Padilla because civil commitment is not automatic like deportation because state commitment statute requires individualized assessment); see also Hughes, 953 N.
of the consequences they face, and informing the public of the scope of consequences we impose.
The department must expand its view of consequence management in several ways.
The allocation of consequence management assets should not be handled on a first-come, first-served basis, but should be based on an understanding of the tradeoffs among competing demands.
The focus was on using open-ended elicitation methods for mapping the domain of consequences of STD prevention measures that are salient to this age group, and on generating empirically based hypotheses for further study.
Once the complete hst of consequences was established, two of the authors were trained as coders.
This is because there are other characteristics of consequences in addition to just the positive and negative aspects.
The key when developing a plan of consequences is to apply consequences that are positive to shape desired behavior.
Students raised issues of consequences ("People did something bad and there wasn't a consequence;" "Fake.
There are three important distinctions to make when speaking of consequences.
Officials should view this right as more than a minor consideration in the balancing of consequences.
Parents sometimes ``go on the warpath'' and set a bunch of consequences.
Awareness of consequences can be based on factual knowledge or on belief.
The likelihood of consequences also differed by type of sex.
There should be a range of consequences that are logical - not punitive - and connected to the behavior (Saphier and Gower, 1987).