occasion

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an auspicious occasion

A celebratory or momentous event, situation, or circumstance. (Note that the meaning of auspicious here is slightly altered from its standard definition of favorable or timely.) We would like to invite you to the auspicious occasion of the marriage of our son, Luke, to his bride-to-be, Sophia. It was an auspicious day in the city, as people poured onto the streets to celebrate the queen's ascent to the throne.
See also: occasion

equal to the occasion

Having the necessary ability, talent, qualities, or capability to handle or accomplish a given role or situation. The young soldier proved equal to the occasion and saved his platoon from an enemy ambush. We need a manager who can lead project initiatives and efficiently direct employees—do you think you're equal to the occasion?
See also: equal, occasion

leave something for another occasion

 and keep something for another occasion
to hold something back for later. (Occasion can be replaced with time, day, person, etc.) Please leave some cake for another day. Don't eat all the cheese. Leave some for another occasion. I have to leave some of my earnings for next month.
See also: another, leave, occasion

on occasion

occasionally. I like to go to the movies on occasion. On occasion, Mary would walk her dog through the park.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

Fig. to meet the challenge of an event; to try extra hard to do a task. John was able to rise to the occasion and make the conference a success. It was a big challenge, but he rose to the occasion.
See also: occasion, rise

on occasion

sometimes but not often This is the sun belt, but we do get freezing weather here on occasion.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

to do what is needed at the time When a crisis hits, will you rise to the occasion? She needed some help, so I rose to the occasion and volunteered my services. Related vocabulary: rise to something
See also: occasion, rise

rise to the occasion

to succeed in dealing with a difficult situation It's not easy to play your first match in front of a crowd that size but he certainly rose to the occasion.
See come back from the dead
See also: occasion, rise

on occasion

From time to time, now and then, as in Nell has been known to eat meat on occasion. This usage, first in the form of upon occasion, replaced by occasion about 1600.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

Show unexpected skill in dealing with a difficulty that arises, as in The leading man broke his leg in the first act but his understudy rose to the occasion and was rewarded with excellent reviews . [Mid-1800s]
See also: occasion, rise

on occasion

From time to time; now and then.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

To find the ability to deal with an unexpected challenge.
See also: occasion, rise

take the occasion

To make use of the opportunity (to do something).
See also: occasion, take
References in classic literature ?
There was no occasion to make much moan about this state of affairs.
Drake looked in, and instructed her on this occasion, for the first time, to lay the table for two persons.
On the drunken occasion in question (one of a large number, as you know), I was insufferable about liking you, and not liking you.
Occasionally, he shot himself out of his equipage head-foremost over the apron; and I saw him on one occasion deliver himself at the door of the Grove in this unintentional way - like coals.
There stood by him, on each side, a young page with flaps in their hands, and when they saw he was at leisure, one of them gently struck his mouth, and the other his right ear; at which he startled like one awaked on the sudden, and looking towards me and the company I was in, recollected the occasion of our coming, whereof he had been informed before.
The private attachments of one man might easily be satisfied; but to satisfy the private attachments of a dozen, or of twenty men, would occasion a monopoly of all the principal employments of the government in a few families, and would lead more directly to an aristocracy or an oligarchy than any measure that could be contrived.
We are not informed whether the horses were stolen through the instigation and management of Rose; it is not improbable, for such was the perfidy he had intended to practice on a former occasion toward Mr.
When we reached the rock that abruptly terminated the path, and concealed from us the festive scene, wild shouts and a confused blending of voices assured me that the occasion, whatever it might be, had drawn together a great multitude.
From one or two friends there on the occasion of my marriage.
On more than one occasion I went outside the house to get ready for bed, or to wait until the family had gone to bed.
On several occasions, when the Beagle has been within the mouth of the Plata, the rigging has been coated with the web of the Gossamer Spider.
The other lady, having no other arguments to use, betook herself to the entreaties usual on such occasions, and begged her not to frighten herself, for it might be of very ill consequence to her own health; and, filling out a very large glass of wine, advised, and at last prevailed with her to drink it.
We often feel that something in our sensible environment is familiar, without having any definite recollection of previous occasions on which we have seen it.
On two occasions only--both equally harmless to the individual on whom I practised--did I summon to myself the assistance of chemical knowledge.
It was a long time too--for Never, as the proverb says, is a long day-- before they forgot to have an interest in wounded soldiers at the Maypole, or before Joe omitted to refresh them, for the sake of his old campaign; or before the serjeant left off looking in there, now and then; or before they fatigued themselves, or each other, by talking on these occasions of battles and sieges, and hard weather and hard service, and a thousand things belonging to a soldier's life.