occasion

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an auspicious occasion

A celebratory or momentous event, situation, or circumstance. (Note that the meaning of auspicious here is slightly altered from its standard definition of favorable or timely.) We would like to invite you to the auspicious occasion of the marriage of our son, Luke, to his bride-to-be, Sophia. It was an auspicious day in the city, as people poured onto the streets to celebrate the queen's ascent to the throne.
See also: occasion

equal to the occasion

Having the necessary ability, talent, qualities, or capability to handle or accomplish a given role or situation. The young soldier proved equal to the occasion and saved his platoon from an enemy ambush. We need a manager who can lead project initiatives and efficiently direct employees—do you think you're equal to the occasion?
See also: equal, occasion

on occasion

Once in a while; occasionally. I don't really drink, but I do enjoy a nice glass of wine with a meal on occasion.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

To increase one's effort in response to a challenging situation. If you're going to lead this team, you've got to rise to the occasion and start motivating them. It was a tough act to follow, but the band rose to the occasion and played the best set of their career.
See also: occasion, rise

leave something for another occasion

 and keep something for another occasion
to hold something back for later. (Occasion can be replaced with time, day, person, etc.) Please leave some cake for another day. Don't eat all the cheese. Leave some for another occasion. I have to leave some of my earnings for next month.
See also: another, leave, occasion

on occasion

occasionally. I like to go to the movies on occasion. On occasion, Mary would walk her dog through the park.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

Fig. to meet the challenge of an event; to try extra hard to do a task. John was able to rise to the occasion and make the conference a success. It was a big challenge, but he rose to the occasion.
See also: occasion, rise

on occasion

From time to time, now and then, as in Nell has been known to eat meat on occasion. This usage, first in the form of upon occasion, replaced by occasion about 1600.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

Show unexpected skill in dealing with a difficulty that arises, as in The leading man broke his leg in the first act but his understudy rose to the occasion and was rewarded with excellent reviews . [Mid-1800s]
See also: occasion, rise

rise to the occasion

perform better than usual in response to a special situation or event.
See also: occasion, rise

have occasion to do something

(formal) have a reason or need to do something: If you ever have occasion to visit Zurich, you will always be welcome to stay with us.
See also: have, occasion, something

on ocˈcasion(s)

sometimes; not very often: I don’t smoke cigarettes but I like to smoke a cigar on occasion.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the ocˈcasion/ˈchallenge

do something successfully in a difficult situation, emergency, etc: When the lead singer became ill, Cathy had to take her place. Everyone thought she rose to the occasion magnificently.This company must be prepared to rise to the challenge of a rapidly changing market.
See also: challenge, occasion, rise

a sense of ocˈcasion

a feeling or an understanding that an event is important or special: Candles on the table gave the evening a sense of occasion.
See also: occasion, of, sense

on occasion

From time to time; now and then.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

To find the ability to deal with an unexpected challenge.
See also: occasion, rise

take the occasion

To make use of the opportunity (to do something).
See also: occasion, take