occasion

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an auspicious occasion

A celebratory or momentous event, situation, or circumstance. (Note that the meaning of auspicious here is slightly altered from its standard definition of favorable or timely.) We would like to invite you to the auspicious occasion of the marriage of our son, Luke, to his bride-to-be, Sophia. It was an auspicious day in the city, as people poured onto the streets to celebrate the queen's ascent to the throne.
See also: occasion

equal to the occasion

Having the necessary ability, talent, qualities, or capability to handle or accomplish a given role or situation. The young soldier proved equal to the occasion and saved his platoon from an enemy ambush. We need a manager who can lead project initiatives and efficiently direct employees—do you think you're equal to the occasion?
See also: equal, occasion

leave something for another occasion

 and keep something for another occasion
to hold something back for later. (Occasion can be replaced with time, day, person, etc.) Please leave some cake for another day. Don't eat all the cheese. Leave some for another occasion. I have to leave some of my earnings for next month.
See also: another, leave, occasion

on occasion

occasionally. I like to go to the movies on occasion. On occasion, Mary would walk her dog through the park.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

Fig. to meet the challenge of an event; to try extra hard to do a task. John was able to rise to the occasion and make the conference a success. It was a big challenge, but he rose to the occasion.
See also: occasion, rise

on occasion

sometimes but not often This is the sun belt, but we do get freezing weather here on occasion.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

to do what is needed at the time When a crisis hits, will you rise to the occasion? She needed some help, so I rose to the occasion and volunteered my services. Related vocabulary: rise to something
See also: occasion, rise

rise to the occasion

to succeed in dealing with a difficult situation It's not easy to play your first match in front of a crowd that size but he certainly rose to the occasion.
See come back from the dead
See also: occasion, rise

on occasion

From time to time, now and then, as in Nell has been known to eat meat on occasion. This usage, first in the form of upon occasion, replaced by occasion about 1600.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

Show unexpected skill in dealing with a difficulty that arises, as in The leading man broke his leg in the first act but his understudy rose to the occasion and was rewarded with excellent reviews . [Mid-1800s]
See also: occasion, rise

on occasion

From time to time; now and then.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

To find the ability to deal with an unexpected challenge.
See also: occasion, rise

take the occasion

To make use of the opportunity (to do something).
See also: occasion, take
References in classic literature ?
These extensive arrangements occasioned us to be cut off unceremoniously in respect of breakfast; "for I an't," said Mrs.
Still, however, the necessary intercourse between the lords of the soil, and those oppressed inferior beings by whom that soil was cultivated, occasioned the gradual formation of a dialect, compounded betwixt the French and the Anglo-Saxon, in which they could render themselves mutually intelligible to each other; and from this necessity arose by degrees the structure of our present English language, in which the speech of the victors and the vanquished have been so happily blended together; and which has since been so richly improved by importations from the classical languages, and from those spoken by the southern nations of Europe.
All the advantages of the stability, both of the Executive and of the Senate, would be defeated by this union, and infinite delays and embarrassments would be occasioned.
Not a single Indian war has yet been occasioned by aggressions of the present federal government, feeble as it is; but there are several instances of Indian hostilities having been provoked by the improper conduct of individual States, who, either unable or unwilling to restrain or punish offenses, have given occasion to the slaughter of many innocent inhabitants.
Guppy's breast and the numerous oscillations it occasioned him between his mother's door and us were sufficiently conspicuous in the windy street (particularly as his hair wanted cutting) to make us hurry away.
Here a torrent of tears had the same consequence with what the suppression had occasioned to Mr Allworthy, and she remained silent.
I was at a strange loss to understand this, and resolved to spend some time in the observing it, to see if nothing from the sets of the tide had occasioned it; but I was presently convinced how it was - viz.