occasion


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an auspicious occasion

A celebratory or momentous event, situation, or circumstance. (Note that the meaning of auspicious here is slightly altered from its standard definition of favorable or timely.) We would like to invite you to the auspicious occasion of the marriage of our son, Luke, to his bride-to-be, Sophia. It was an auspicious day in the city, as people poured onto the streets to celebrate the queen's ascent to the throne.
See also: occasion

equal to the occasion

Having the necessary ability, talent, qualities, or capability to handle or accomplish a given role or situation. The young soldier proved equal to the occasion and saved his platoon from an enemy ambush. We need a manager who can lead project initiatives and efficiently direct employees—do you think you're equal to the occasion?
See also: equal, occasion

leave something for another occasion

 and keep something for another occasion
to hold something back for later. (Occasion can be replaced with time, day, person, etc.) Please leave some cake for another day. Don't eat all the cheese. Leave some for another occasion. I have to leave some of my earnings for next month.
See also: another, leave, occasion

on occasion

occasionally. I like to go to the movies on occasion. On occasion, Mary would walk her dog through the park.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

Fig. to meet the challenge of an event; to try extra hard to do a task. John was able to rise to the occasion and make the conference a success. It was a big challenge, but he rose to the occasion.
See also: occasion, rise

on occasion

sometimes but not often This is the sun belt, but we do get freezing weather here on occasion.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

to do what is needed at the time When a crisis hits, will you rise to the occasion? She needed some help, so I rose to the occasion and volunteered my services. Related vocabulary: rise to something
See also: occasion, rise

rise to the occasion

to succeed in dealing with a difficult situation It's not easy to play your first match in front of a crowd that size but he certainly rose to the occasion.
See come back from the dead
See also: occasion, rise

on occasion

From time to time, now and then, as in Nell has been known to eat meat on occasion. This usage, first in the form of upon occasion, replaced by occasion about 1600.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

Show unexpected skill in dealing with a difficulty that arises, as in The leading man broke his leg in the first act but his understudy rose to the occasion and was rewarded with excellent reviews . [Mid-1800s]
See also: occasion, rise

on occasion

From time to time; now and then.
See also: occasion, on

rise to the occasion

To find the ability to deal with an unexpected challenge.
See also: occasion, rise

take the occasion

To make use of the opportunity (to do something).
See also: occasion, take
References in classic literature ?
One of the most remarkable occasions, when the habit of bygone days awoke in me, was that which brings it within the law of literary propriety to offer the public the sketch which I am now writing.
The curse of those occasions is heavy upon me, for I always remember them.
For," says Herbert to me, coming home to dinner on one of those special occasions, "I find the truth to be, Handel, that an opening won't come to one, but one must go to it - so I have been.
The women of the island have abundance of vivacity: they, contemn their husbands, and are exceedingly fond of strangers, whereof there is always a considerable number from the continent below, attending at court, either upon affairs of the several towns and corporations, or their own particular occasions, but are much despised, because they want the same endowments.
It is known that the governor claims the right of nomination, upon the strength of some ambiguous expressions in the constitution; but it is not known to what extent, or in what manner he exercises it; nor upon what occasions he is contradicted or opposed.
And here Grandfather took occasion to talk rather tediously about the nature and forms of government that established themselves, almost spontaneously, in Massachusetts and the other New England colonies.
This sagacious chief endeavored, on every occasion, to restrain the predatory propensities of his tribe when directed against the white men.
When we reached the rock that abruptly terminated the path, and concealed from us the festive scene, wild shouts and a confused blending of voices assured me that the occasion, whatever it might be, had drawn together a great multitude.
Her bridal adornments, it is true, at first caused some little dismay, having painted and anointed herself for the occasion according to the Chinook toilet; by dint, however, of copious ablutions, she was freed from all adventitious tint and fragrance, and entered into the nuptial state, the cleanest princess that had ever been known, of the somewhat unctuous tribe of the Chinooks.
From one or two friends there on the occasion of my marriage.
You have referred to an occasion, miss, when I--when I did myself the honour of making a declaration which--"
On more than one occasion I went outside the house to get ready for bed, or to wait until the family had gone to bed.
On another occasion, when seventeen miles off Cape Corrientes, I had a net overboard to catch pelagic animals.
The reader may perhaps be surprized, that, instead of endeavouring to revive the patient, the learned gentlemen should fall immediately into a dispute on the occasion of his death; but in reality all such experiments had been made before their arrival: for the captain was put into a warm bed, had his veins scarified, his forehead chafed, and all sorts of strong drops applied to his lips and nostrils.
The fact that a man can recite a poem does not show that he remembers any previous occasion on which he has recited or read it.