oath

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Related to oaths: vows, Loyalty oaths

take an oath

To make a formal, binding promise (to do something). You took an oath when you agreed to be a witness in this trial, so you must answer my questions completely truthfully! We all took oaths to keep this a secret until the day we die.
See also: oath, take

on oath

Bound by a formal promise to tell the complete and honest truth about an event while on the witness stand in a trial. You are on oath as a witness in this trial, so you must answer my questions completely truthfully! Consider your answer carefully—you're still on oath.
See also: oath, on

under oath

Bound by a formal promise to tell the complete and honest truth about an event while on the witness stand in a trial. You are under oath as a witness in this trial, so you must answer my questions completely truthfully! Consider your answer carefully—you're still under oath.
See also: oath

take an oath

to make an oath; to swear to something. You must take an oath that you will never tell anyone about this. When I was a witness in court, I had to take an oath that I would tell the truth.
See also: oath, take

under oath

Fig. bound by an oath; having taken an oath. You must tell the truth because you are under oath. I was placed under oath before I could testify in the trial.
See also: oath

on/under ˈoath

(law) having made a formal promise to tell the truth in a court of law: Is she prepared to give evidence on oath?The judge reminded the witness that he was still under oath.
See also: oath, on

take an oath

To agree to a pledge of truthfulness or faithful performance.
See also: oath, take

under oath

Under a burden or responsibility to speak truthfully or perform an action faithfully.
See also: oath
References in periodicals archive ?
In short, the idea behind the rhetoric of English loyalty oaths was to protect authority and power through a kind of allegiance politics.
Evidence Act, RSBC 1996, c 124, sections 21 to 22 discusses the validity of the oath regardless of absence or difference of religious belief, as well as oaths administered by uplifted hand.
It is with this principle in hand that Agamben unlocks the enigma of the oath as that primordial function whereby speaking beings try to curtail the irreducible possibility of language's perjuries: the "proper context of the oath is therefore among those institutions.
If tribes adopted constitutions during the Indian Self-Determination era of the 1970s and beyond, then their oaths of office will reflect a surging sense of self-governance, autonomy, and a purposeful distance from the federal and especially the state governments.
Now a group of 22 MPs, including Newport West's Paul Flynn and Gower MP Martin Caton, have signed a Commons motion calling for the oath to be reformed.
Kearney-Brown, also a Quaker, inserted "nonviolently" in front of the word "defend" when she signed her oath.
Lady Boothroyd said she would back an oath that did not refer to the monarchy: "I would support that.
2252 A person commits perjury when he makes a promise under oath with no intention of keeping it, or when after promising on oath he does not keep it.
Scholars disapproved of frivolous divorces and might help by disallowing oaths if evidence showed that the man had been temporarily insane or in some way mentally deficient, or that he had pronounced an incorrect formula.
Kalonzo should save himself from the embarrassment and ridicule Raila has had to go through since he took the purported oath, and respect the Constitution.
The relation to the Hippocratic Oath would be represented by the name of the oath when it includes the word Hippocratic or because the authors recognized having based their oaths on the Hippocratic Oath.
The Interpretation has clarified that any oath taken in a manner that is not sincere or solemn is considered a "decline" to take an oath, and that the oath taken is rendered invalid.
Returning Officer Sajjad Abro administered oath to them at the ceremony held at YMCA Lawn here.
Given the difference between oaths as a social convention and oath formulae, the author's choice to translate terms like mamitu(m), nis ili(m), and lingai- by "conditional curse" instead of "oath" as is customary seems inadequate (see esp.
Duterte has opted for a quick and frugal ceremony at Malacanang, dispensing with elaborate rites at Quirino Grandstand, where some of the previous Presidents have taken their oaths, including outgoing President Aquino.