none too

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none too something

not very something; not at all something. The towels in the bathroom were none too clean. It was none too warm in their house.
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none too

not very I gripped the back of his neck and, none too gently, gave his head a firm shake.
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none too

Also, not too. Not very, as in The application arrived none too soon, or I'm afraid this secretary is not too smart, or He was here not too long ago. The first usage was first recorded in 1885; the variant dates from about 1920. Also see not all that.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Not too long ago I did a Google search on the Internet, entering "Evangelism, New Testament.
And, as John Reumann said not too long ago, "The resurrection of Jesus and its implications for believers, living their life now 'in Christ' and hoping to be 'with Christ' at the future resurrection and judgment, are major topics in Paul's theology and mission praxis.
We all know that we raised taxes not too long ago, not because the American people rose up and called their Congressmen and said we wanted you to repeal this tax and change the taxes.
Our administration is not too interested in the Kyoto Protocol, but that may well come down the road, and the enforcement of the Kyoto Protocol many believe will be enforced by the WTO.
Fernandez Tejero's study is not too detailed but it manages to produce some new evidence mainly by combing through the Latin Explanationes of 1580-1589 (see below).
She reassured him that his topic was not too narrow or otherwise inadequate.
It is not too harsh: he promises to preside over a ``Quality of Life Congress.
The corporation benefits from operating losses only if has taxable income in other years not too far removed from the loss year.
Although I did not fully comprehend the situation, I was not too young to feel the heavy burden of grief and loss that literally crushed this man that I loved so much.
As long as th facts are true and the texts not too similar, it seems to me very problematic to decide whether it i case of parallel knowledge or borrowing.
Commenting on Conclusion 4 of Chapter 8 of the White Paper (that periodic adjustments generally be prospective unless a different royalty rate would have been set on the date of transfer based upon expectations of the parties), John Calderwood, Canadian Tax Foundation, supra note 6, states at page 17: "The above statment is not too clear.