on no account

(redirected from not on any account)

on no account

For no reason or incentive; not for anything. On no account will I agree to sign this deal; it is an insult to me and my family! You must on no account give your banking details to anyone over the phone or by email.
See also: account, on

on no account

 and not on any account
for no reason; absolutely not. On no account will I lend you the money. Will I say I'm sorry? Not on any account.
See also: account, on

on no account

Also, not on any account. Under no circumstances, certainly not, as in On no account should you put a metal utensil in the microwave oven, or Dad said we can't go, not on any account. [Mid-1800s]
See also: account, on

on ˈno account

,

not on ˈany account

not for any reason: On no account (should you) try to fix the heater yourself. All repairs should be done by a trained engineer.
See also: account, on

on no account

Under no circumstances.
See also: account, on
References in classic literature ?
In the second case one can say nothing except to encourage such princes to provision and fortify their towns, and not on any account to defend the country.
It was an office in short, from which, unwilling to give Edward the pain of receiving an obligation from HER, she would have been very glad to be spared herself;-- but Colonel Brandon, on motives of equal delicacy, declining it likewise, still seemed so desirous of its being given through her means, that she would not on any account make farther opposition.
Then let the bird fly away,' said the Princess; and she would not on any account allow the Prince to come.
In fact my master was so difficult to deal with that I dared not on any account pay down the money at once.
I would not on any account trifle with her affectionate solicitude; or allow her to hear it from any one but myself.
Then he described the oath which every member of that small remnant of a noble body took, and which was of a dreadful and impressive kind; binding him, at the bidding of his chief, to resist and obstruct the Lord Mayor, sword-bearer, and chaplain; to despise the authority of the sheriffs; and to hold the court of aldermen as nought; but not on any account, in case the fulness of time should bring a general rising of 'prentices, to damage or in any way disfigure Temple Bar, which was strictly constitutional and always to be approached with reverence.