nose


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Related to nose: nose bleeds, Stuffy nose

nose something (out) (onto something)

to drive or push something carefully out onto the surface of something, nose first. I nosed the car out onto the highway, looking both ways. She nosed out the car.

nose

verb
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References in classic literature ?
They all stretched themselves on the floor, their noses pointing to the ceiling.
There was good luck promised out of the crook of your nose, but ye bear fruit like the bang of a drum.
Step down the steps," says the man with the crooked nose, "and I will enter by the door above and let ye in.
That man, I fancy, has gone a very crooked road--by following his nose.
It was a bronze coin, and the colour, combined with the exact curve of the Roman nose and something in the very lift of the long, wiry neck, made the head of Caesar on it the almost precise portrait of Philip Hawker.
I don't know why a touch on the nose should affect my imagination so much.
I went up the steep street to my own house with my head in a whirl; it had not begun to clear when I came to the doorstep, on which I found a milk-can--and the man with the twisted nose.
It was the tip of a crooked nose, crushed against the glass; it looked white with the pressure; and the staring face and eyes behind it were at first invisible and afterwards grey like a ghost.
He felt Jerry's cool nose against his bare calf, heard his joyous sniff, and bent and caressed him.
He pressed his cool nose to Skipper's leg, and the rose-kiss of his tongue brought him the salt taste of sea-water.
It was sitting on a log, not a foot beyond the end of his nose.
Then she fell to backing away and sneezing, her nose bristling with quills like a monstrous pin- cushion.
To tell the truth," returned Sancho, "the monstrous nose of that squire has filled me with fear and terror, and I dare not stay near him.
Thy advice is not bad," said Don Quixote, "for of enemies the fewer the better;" and he was drawing his sword to carry into effect Sancho's counsel and suggestion, when the squire of the Mirrors came up, now without the nose which had made him so hideous, and cried out in a loud voice, "Mind what you are about, Senor Don Quixote; that is your friend, the bachelor Samson Carrasco, you have at your feet, and I am his squire.
said Sancho, seeing him without the hideous feature he had before; to which he replied, "I have it here in my pocket," and putting his hand into his right pocket, he pulled out a masquerade nose of varnished pasteboard of the make already described; and Sancho, examining him more and more closely, exclaimed aloud in a voice of amazement, "Holy Mary be good to me