non sequitur


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non sequitur

A statement that does not logically fit into the current conversation. Good luck getting answers from him—his every response to my questions so far has been a non sequitur. A: "I changed the oil in the car." B: "Well, that's a complete non sequitur, since I asked if you were hungry!"
See also: non, sequitur

a ˌnon ˈsequitur

(from Latin, formal) a statement that does not seem to follow what has just been said in any natural or logical way: In the middle of a discussion about the weather, Liz started talking about fish. Everyone ignored the non sequitur completely.
The Latin phrase means ‘it does not follow’.
See also: non, sequitur
References in periodicals archive ?
Donning a dog collar as the holy man from hell, Williams gallops through his usual repertoire of imitations, accents, non sequiturs and wild gesticulations.
Arnold entered office with fanfare, glamour and half of the Kennedy family by his side, which has to go down as one of the biggest political non sequiturs in the annals of American culture.
The plan consists, in the main, of generalities, good wishes and non sequiturs.
The movie displays a plot-light structure, abrupt mood swings, frisky non sequiturs and, above all, a restless young protagonist brought to life by a first-time performer.
Clearly not someone to do anything by halves, Prenant herself (who looks considerably younger than her 47 years) plays both roles in the framing device of two dissimilar ditzes, rebellious Myope and contented Lunettes, who bounce around a Paris apartment declaiming non sequiturs on everything from sex and politics to the world in general.
The court acknowledged that there were massive differences in sentencing when the victim was white or black, but concluded, in one of the grandest non sequiturs of recent jurisprudence, that there was nothing discriminatory in this.
Pinter's comic vision of paranoia and isolation is reinforced by his use of dialogue, including frequent pauses, disjointed conversations, and non sequiturs.
In it he satirized, by way of outrageous puns and uproarious non sequiturs, almost every aspect of contemporary society.
JOE Hedley (Views of the North, March 16) surely sets a new record for non sequiturs and logical fallacies.
My Name is Dee is either a groundbreaking piece of science fiction with a unique language, style, and thought process, or it's a rambling Babel of confusing non sequiturs and seemingly random episodes.
Every week a swathe of non sequiturs, inadvertent malapropisms and mixed metaphors are spouted by football pundits.
Her most ostensibly expressive canvases can also be read as linguistic propositions, or speech acts, since they invariably include aphoristic phrases like "Kissing the canvas" or "Desire is war"; quotations, like Guy Debord's "Seeking the death that is life"; or seeming non sequiturs, like "20 minutes" and "Allein
He also deals in visual non sequiturs, visionary Cinema-Scope cinematography, and an approach to directing actors that seems to involve encouraging them to mumble like stoners or scream like wild animals.
British playwright who was noted for his absurdity and humor achieved chiefly by cunning manipulation of phrasing and by frequent use of double entendres and, especially, of non sequiturs.
The result was Novel on Yellow Paper (1936), a spirited, amusing, and rather bizarre monologue in a style full of digressions and non sequiturs that many likened to Gertrude Stein ' s.