nobody

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a nobody

Someone who is entirely unimportant, unsuccessful, or without power or influence. He's a nobody at the office; no one even knows he exists.
See also: nobody

it's an ill wind that blows nobody any good

Even the most negative or harmful situations usually benefit someone. Thus a situation that benefits no one must be truly bad (and rare). The rain caused flooding, but it may help the farmers. It's an ill wind that blows nobody any good.
See also: any, blow, good, ill, nobody, wind

nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American people

People being swindled won't realize or question it, which makes them a prime source of income for others. The phrase is typically attributed to writer H.L. Mencken. A: "We can't sell this shoddy product to people!" B: "Oh please, nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American people."

on the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog

A phrase that highlights the anonymous nature of online correspondence. It originally appeared in a cartoon by Peter Steiner. A: "I can't say something that mean, even to a stranger." B: "Oh, sure you can! On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog."
See also: dog, know, nobody, on

It's an ill wind that blows nobody (any) good.

Prov. Even misfortune can benefit someone or something.; A calamity for one person usually benefits somebody else. The tremendous hailstorm left gaping holes in most of the roofs in town, so many families were homeless. The roofing companies, however, made plenty of money fixing those holes. It's an ill wind that blows nobody any good.
See also: blow, good, ill, nobody, wind

like crazy

 and like mad
Fig. furiously; very much, fast, many, or actively. People are coming in here like crazy. There isn't enough room for them all. We sold ice cream like crazy. It was a very hot day.
See also: crazy, like

like nobody's business

Inf. very well; very much. She can sing like nobody's business. What a set of pipes! My mom can cook chocolate chip cookies like nobody's business.
See also: business, like

nobody's fool

Fig. a sensible and wise person who is not easily deceived. Mary is nobody's fool. She watches out for people who might try to cheat her. Anne may seem as though she's not very bright, but she's nobody's fool.
See also: fool

none of someone's business

not of someone's concern. (A gentle rebuke.) Q: When are you going to leave for home? A: None of your business. How I managed to afford all this is none of your business.
See also: business, none, of

There's nobody home.

There are no brains in someone's head. There's lots of goodwill in that head, but there's nobody home. What a fool! There's nobody home—that's for sure.
See also: home, nobody

like nobody's business

very quickly, very easily, or very well Kids can work the Internet like nobody's business.
See also: business, like

none of your business

also nobody's business
do not interest yourself in matters that do not involve you “Those children should never be left alone.” “Don't tell me what to do - it's none of your business.”
See also: business, none, of

like crazy

1. a lot like mad She itched like crazy.
2. very quickly like mad The cucumbers here grow like crazy.
See also: crazy, like

like crazy

  (informal)
if you do something like crazy, you do it a lot or very quickly We'll have to work like crazy to finish the decorating by the weekend.
See also: crazy, like

be no/nobody's fool

to be intelligent John's no fool. He's never going to believe that excuse.
See also: fool

The lights are on but nobody's/no-one's home.

  (humorous)
something that you say when you think someone is stupid, or when someone does not react because they are thinking about something else It's no good expecting John to say anything. The lights are on but no-one's home.
See punch lights out
See also: but, home, lights, on

like nobody's business

  (informal)
very quickly or very well We get through butter in our house like nobody's business. She cooks like nobody's business. (= she cooks very well)
See be no's fool
See also: business, like

like crazy

Also, like mad; like nobody's business. With exceeding enthusiasm or speed, without restraint. For example, We shopped like crazy and bought all our furniture in one day, or Once he's out of the town limits he drives like mad, or The choir sang the Hallelujah Chorus like nobody's business. The first terms employ crazy and mad in the sense of "lunatic" as a hyperbole for lack of restraint; the third implies that no business could be conducted in such an extraordinary fashion. The first and third date from the 1920s, the second from the mid-1600s.
See also: crazy, like

nobody home

1. No one is paying attention, as in She threw the ball right past him, yelling "Nobody home!"
2. The person being discussed is mentally impaired and so cannot understand, as in When the woman did not answer, he concluded it was a case of nobody home. Both usages transfer the absence of someone in a dwelling to absent-mindedness or mental deficiency, and are thought to have been invented by cartoonist and journalist Thomas Aloysius Dorgan ("TAD") around 1900. He often embellished his column with such punning amplifications as "Nobody home but the telephone and that's in the hands of the receiver," or "Nobody home but the oyster and that's in the stew."
See also: home, nobody

nobody's fool

A person who cannot be duped or taken advantage of, as in You can't put anything over on Ryan-he's nobody's fool. [Early 1900s]
See also: fool

like crazy

and like mad
mod. furiously; very much, fast, many, or actively. Look at those people on the bank. They’re catching fish like mad! I’m running like mad and still can’t catch up.
See also: crazy, like

like nobody’s business

mod. very well; very much; very fast. She can sing like nobody’s business. What a set of pipes!
See also: business, like

a nobody

n. an insignificant person. (Compare this with somebody.) Don’t pay any attention to him. He’s just a nobody.
See also: nobody

There’s nobody home

sent. There are no brains in someone’s head. You twit! There’s nobody home—that’s for sure.
See also: home, nobody

like crazy

Informal
To an exceeding degree: They were running around like crazy.
See also: crazy, like
References in periodicals archive ?
If that's correct," said one reporter playing the devil's advocate, "then why do all of the other nobodies tell lies all the time?
People didn't pay any attention to them, except for a few nobodies who whined, "What happened to Nobody's News?
Its demise sent shock-waves rippling through Wall Street, where hundreds of nobodies sold off their stocks and wandered aimlessly through the streets dreaming of the good old days when Somebody was Nobody.
Yeah, they want the truth alright-when it's about nobodies like themselves.
Since the problems described in Somebodies and Nobodies are anecdotal--albeit universal--it's hard to evaluate Fuller's argument that the Somebodies will benefit by eliminating rankism when dealing with Nobodies.
Somebodies and Nobodies boasts no fewer than 30 prepublication endorsements.
These are the folks who are fighting secession, not the nobodies in Los Angeles and in the Valley , but the somebodies, who depend upon City Hall for a generous income, and those who would like to curry favor with them.
Back at the rally, the music was shut off and the nobodies took over the microphone.
Not that they've bothered to actually ask the people lately, but how lucky for them that what's best for all those nobodies just happens to mean more bread for all those somebodies.