no pain, no gain


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No pain, no gain.

Fig. If you want to improve, you must work so hard that it hurts. (Associated with sports and physical exercise.) Player: I can't do any more push-ups. My muscles hurt. Coach: No pain, no gain. Come on, everybody! Run one more lap! No pain, no gain!
See also: gain

no pain, no gain

Suffering is needed to make progress, as in I've worked for hours on those irregular French verbs, but no pain, no gain. Although this idiom is often associated with athletic coaches who urge athletes to train harder, it dates from the 1500s and was already in John Ray's proverb collection of 1670 as "Without pains, no gains."
See also: gain

no pain, no gain

People say no pain, no gain to mean that you cannot achieve anything without effort or suffering. I exercise every day. No pain, no gain.
See also: gain

no pain, no gain

suffering is necessary in order to achieve something.
There has been a proverbial association between pain and gain since at least the late 16th century, and ‘No Paines, no Gaines’ was the title of a 1648 poem by Robert Herrick . The modern form, which dates from the 1980s, probably originated as a slogan used in fitness classes.
1997 American Spectator As the cliché goes, no pain, no gain. In fact, in our confessional age, you can make quite a lot of gains for very little pain.
See also: gain