ninepin


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

go down like ninepins

To succumb to a particular problem, often an illness. This phrase is typically only used when more than one person has been adversely affected. Ninepins is a game that is similar to bowling. Primarily heard in UK. Now that the flu is going through our school, people are going down like ninepins.
See also: down, like, ninepin

fall like ninepins

To succumb to a particular problem. This phrase is typically only used when more than one person has been adversely affected. Ninepins is a game that is similar to bowling. Primarily heard in UK. Now that the flu is going through our school, people are falling down like ninepins.
See also: fall, like, ninepin

drop like ninepins

To succumb to a particular problem, often an illness. This phrase is typically only used when more than one person has been adversely affected. Ninepins is a game that is similar to bowling. Primarily heard in UK. Now that the flu is going through our school, people are dropping like ninepins.
See also: drop, like, ninepin

fall like ninepins

or

go down like ninepins

or

drop like ninepins

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If people or things fall like ninepins, go down like ninepins or drop like ninepins, a lot of them are very quickly injured, killed or destroyed. Sgt Russell Smith, 35, told of his terror at seeing officers `falling like ninepins'. There was a time when Liverpool players never seemed to get injured, but now they're going down like ninepins. Note: Ninepins are skittles.
See also: fall, like, ninepin

go down (or drop or fall) like ninepins

topple or succumb in large numbers.
1994 Beryl Gilroy Sunlight on Sweet Water They were falling like ninepins to the wizardry of our fast bowler, Bachan.
See also: down, like, ninepin

ˌgo down, ˌdrop, etc. like ˈninepins

(informal)
1 (of large numbers of people) become ill/sick, be killed or die at the same time: In last year’s flu epidemic both children and teachers at this school were going down like ninepins.As the enemy advanced, men and horses went down like ninepins.
2 (of businesses, etc.) fail, go out of business, etc: Small businesses are going down like ninepins at the moment.
In the game of ninepins, you roll a ball towards a group of nine wooden objects (= skittles) in order to knock down as many of them as possible.
See also: like, ninepin
References in periodicals archive ?
The choice of these two landmarks was based on the tentative assumption that the critical feature of the cube that distinguished it from the ninepin and beach ball (or equally from a cone) is that it contains edges and corners.
Wickets tumbled like ninepins as leaders Dafen were dismissed for 131 by BS Port Talbot.
A few days ago, hysterical headlines were predicting another global economic crash with banks worldwide falling like ninepins.
But a captain's knock of 56no from Bridge skipper Robbie Jones was of little consolation as he watched his team-mates falling like ninepins on their way to 135 all out.
Hence, we see giant institutions falling like ninepins in the face of this financial earthquake.
There were times when the former Indian skipper stood tall, while others fell like ninepins around him.
Favourites went down like ninepins at the Yorkshire track and odds-on Tidal Bay threw away his race with a last-fence blunder.
Blues' training ground resembled a scene from Casualty this week with players dropping like ninepins.
While others were falling like ninepins his mount was making light of the awesome fences and victory looked there for the taking.
The other New Zealand, French, North American and Irish runners, Maybe Rough, Sydney Opera, Ninepins and Hill Society, were fifth, sixth, ninth and 10th respectively.
Jordan, are tongue-tied by their manifest confusion, while lesser critics fall like ninepins to the cry: 'They are wrong
Rip Van Winkle is an amiable farmer who wanders into the Catskill Mountains, where he comes upon a group of dwarfs playing ninepins.
In literature, the game of ninepins plays an important part in Washington Irving's "Rip Van Winkle," probably his most popular story, issued serially in The Sketch Book (1819-1820).