nine-day wonder

(redirected from nine-day wonders)

nine-day wonder

A person or thing that generates interest for only a short amount of time. The band's biggest fear was becoming a nine-day wonder, soon to be forgotten when the next big sound hit the airwaves.
See also: wonder

nine day wonder

Something with short-lived popularity. The idea is that a song, a fad, or anything else that captures the public's fancy starts out like a house on fire but begins to pall after a little more than a week. The proverb “A wonder lasts nine days, and then the puppy's eyes are open” refers to dogs being born with their eyes shut; like them, the public is blind to the fad until they become sated or bored or both and then their eyes metaphorically open. The earliest recorded use of the phrase came from William Kemp, an Elizabethan comic actor, who in 1600 did a Morris dance over the 130 miles from London to Norwich. His account of his nine-day dance-athon was titled Kemp's Nine Daies Wonder, which would suggest that the phrase had been well in vogue before Kemp used it.
See also: nine, wonder
References in periodicals archive ?
The nine-day wonders of our time are celebrities whose fame exceeds their minimal abilities.
NINE-DAY wonders rarely have much of a future, but Hughie Morrison hopes that Medici Code could be the exception after his stylish effort to complete one of the quickest hat-tricks likely to be seen in 2007.
But any advertiser using him to jump on the BB bandwagon has to be careful because these people are generally nine-day wonders.
The Braves' uninterrupted success is almost taken for granted while nine-day wonders like the '98 Padres and playoff newcomers like this year's Diamondbacks spark more fascination.