nimrod


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nimrod

(ˈnɪmrɑd)
n. a simpleton; a nerd. What stupid nimrod left the lid off the cottage cheese?
References in periodicals archive ?
Several US firms offering upgraded P3s with different surveillance systems, the French offered their Atlantique, and British Aerospace decided on a rebuilt Nimrod using original airframes but with extended wing and fuselage, new engines and total system enhancement.
They will be stationed at RAF Lossiemouth in Moray to plug the gap left by the decision to scrap the Nimrods.
One thing that affected the Nimrod was the consolidation and dispersal of its founders and, thus, the loss of technical and design support in the forty-odd years of its life.
Paul Duquemin, Managing Director of JTC Group s Guernsey office, said: We are delighted to be chosen to administer Nimrod Sea Assets and to have experienced the impressive work by the team at Nimrod Capital LLP.
Party sources say they will opt for a cheaper model because Nimrods are too expensive.
Although a man named Nimrod is depicted in the Bible as a great hunter and city builder, the word is more typically used as a silly schoolyard insult to describe a foolish person.
Flt Lt Squires, 39, died when the plane he was piloting - Nimrod XV230 - exploded in mid-air over Kandahar, in southern Afghanistan, five years ago this month.
Richard Bolchover, a Partner at Nimrod Capital LLP said, "This is the fourth company Nimrod Capital has listed on the SFM.
This leads us to the conclusion that, based on midrashic tradition, Amraphel, Nimrod and Hammurabi are all the same person.
These planes are tried and tested and proved to be far more reliable than Nimrod ever was, and would have been a fraction of the price.
WITH the news that the Government is to axe the Nimrod surveillance planes I am left wondering exactly what this Government's defence strategy is?
The decision to scrap the Nimrod leaves a huge gap in the UK's defence capability and is a betrayal of the workers that played a part in its manufacture.
They said that Britain could face a "massive security gap" by destroying the Nimrod.
Private contractors will soon begin to dismantle the Nimrods, at an estimated cost to the MoD of pounds 200 million.
Many airmen will probably breathe a sigh of relief that the RAF's fleet of Nimrod MR2s are to be withdrawn from service from March - a year earlier than planned.