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come to naught

To be totally unsuccessful or amount to nothing. Our efforts to keep the farm came to naught in the end. All those hours I spent researching my graduate thesis have come to naught.
See also: come, naught

come to nothing

 and come to naught
to amount to nothing; to be worthless. So all my hard work comes to nothing. Yes, the whole project comes to naught.
See also: come, nothing

(all) for naught

(slightly formal)
without achievement or result Marge's time in jail wasn't all for naught – she earned a college degree while she was there.
Usage notes: sometimes, in less formal use, nothing is substituted for naught: I would hate to think that what we'd tried to do was all for nothing.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of naught (zero or nothing)
See also: naught

come to nothing

Also, come to naught. Fail, as in All his efforts have come to nothing, or The last round of peace talks came to naught. The first term dates from the mid-1500s, the variant from the early 1600s.
See also: come, nothing
References in classic literature ?
Refuse and naught can save you; for, though the way to the last stronghold of the Holy Therns was made easy for you, the way hence hath been made impossible.
There could be naught of cruelty or baseness beneath that godlike exterior.
But say the word, Thuvia of Ptarth," he begged, "and naught will give me greater pleasure than meting to this fellow the punishment he has earned.
To arrest him forcibly could mean naught else than war, and yet he had done that which in the eyes of the Ptarth warrior merited death.
The love of Carthoris of Helium," she said simply, "could be naught but an honour to any woman; but you must not speak, my friend, of bestowing upon me that which I may not reciprocate.
I know naught of Helium, nor does the Jeddak of Helium rule Manator.
I heard naught of another," replied Lan-O; "you alone were brought to the towers.
There was naught for Paul of Merely to do but draw his own weapon, in self-defense, for the sharp point of the boy's sword was flashing in and out against his unprotected body, inflicting painful little jabs, and the boy's tongue was murmuring low-toned taunts and insults as it invited him to draw and defend himself or be stuck "like the English pig you are.
But remember, Norman of Torn, that the best answer for an Englishman is the sword; naught else may penetrate his thick wit.
such sweet hopes crushed; his discovery was, after all, to lead to naught, just as his own career was to be cut short.
Then he ends this preface with a prayer that God will give him grace, "so that I say naught but soothfast thing.