murder

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Related to murders: Serial killers

cry bloody murder

Fig. to scream as if something very serious has happened, especially unnecessarily. Now that Bill is really hurt, he's crying bloody murder. There is no point in crying bloody murder about the bill if you knew the restaurant was expensive.
See also: bloody, cry, murder

get away with murder

 
1. Lit. to commit murder and not get punished for it. (See also get away with something.) Don't kill me! You can't get away with murder!
2. Fig. to do something very bad and not get punished for it. That guy always gets away with murder—just because he's cute. You will spoil your son if you let him get away with murder. You should punish him for his back-talk.
See also: away, get, murder

get away with someone or something

to escape, taking someone or something with one. The kidnapper got away with little Brian. The burglars got away with a lot of cash and some diamonds.
See also: away, get

get away with something

 and get by with something
to do something and not get punished for it. (See also get away with murder) You can't get away with that! Larry got by with the lie.
See also: away, get

murder on something

very destructive or harmful to something. Running a marathon is murder on your knees. This dry weather is murder on my crops.
See also: murder, on

Murder will out.

Prov. Murder will always be discovered.; A bad deed will be found out. Horace thought he had disposed of his victim in such a way that no one would ever discover his crime, but murder will out.
See also: murder, out, will

scream bloody murder

 and yell bloody murder
Fig. to complain bitterly; to complain unduly. When we put him in an office without a window, he screamed bloody murder. There is something wrong next door. Everyone is yelling bloody murder.
See also: bloody, murder, scream

get away with something

to avoid blame, punishment, or criticism for doing something bad She cheated on the test and thought she could get away with it.
Usage notes: often in the form get away with it, as in the example
See also: away, get

get away with murder

to not be punished for bad behavior It seems to me that kids these days really get away with murder in the classroom.
See also: away, get, murder

scream bloody murder

to shout or to complain very loudly Sometimes the baby screams bloody murder when we give her a bath. I'm so frustrated with the telephone company, I want to scream bloody murder.
Usage notes: sometimes holler bloody murder and yell bloody murder, with the same meaning
See also: bloody, murder, scream

get away with murder

  (informal)
to be allowed to do things that other people would be punished or criticized for Dave gets away with murder because he's so charming.
See also: away, get, murder

I could murder something.

  (British informal)
something that you say when you want a particular kind of food or drink very much I'm starving. I could murder a curry.
See also: could, murder

scream blue murder

  (British, American & Australian informal) also scream bloody murder (American & Australian informal)
to shout or to complain very loudly Readers screamed blue murder when the price of their daily paper went up. Someone took the child's ice cream away and he started screaming bloody murder.
See also: blue, murder, scream

get away with

1. Escape the consequences or blame for, as in Bill often cheats on exams but usually gets away with it. [Late 1800s]
2. get away with murder. Escape the consequences of killing someone; also, do anything one wishes. For example, If the jury doesn't convict him, he'll have gotten away with murder, or He talks all day on the phone-the supervisor is letting him get away with murder. [First half of 1900s]
See also: away, get

murder will out

Certain news cannot be suppressed, as in He's being charged with embezzlement and fraud-murder will out, you know. This expression already appeared in Chaucer's The Nun's Priest's Tale: "Murder will out that we see day by day." [Late 1300s]
See also: murder, out, will

scream bloody murder

Angrily protest as loudly as possible, as in When Jimmy took her teddy bear, Lauren screamed bloody murder, or Residents are screaming bloody murder about the increase in property taxes. The scream here may be either literal (as in the first example) or figurative, which is also true of invoking murder as though one were in danger of being killed. Versions of this term, such as cry murder, date from the 1400s.
See also: bloody, murder, scream

murder

and slaughter
tv. to overwhelm; to beat someone in a sports contest. We went out on the field prepared to slaughter them. The murdered us in the second half.

scream bloody murder

tv. to scream very loudly; to complain or protest loudly. She screams bloody murder every time I get near her.
See also: bloody, murder, scream

get away with murder

Informal
To escape punishment for or detection of an egregiously blameworthy act.
See also: away, get, murder

murder will out

Secrets or misdeeds will eventually be disclosed.
See also: murder, out, will
References in classic literature ?
It was his humor, now, to decline all conversation on the subject of the murder, until about noon the next day.
But I admit I have another reason for not wanting our Hungarian friend actually hanged for the murder.
Wilson refused to suspect Tom; for first, Tom couldn't murder anybody--he hadn't character enough; secondly, if he could murder a person he wouldn't select his doting benefactor and nearest relative; thirdly, self-interest was in the way; for while the uncle lived, Tom was sure of a free support and a chance to get the destroyed will revived again, but with the uncle gone, that chance was gone too.
The other fugitive, who was evidently in extreme horror of his companion, repeated, "He tried to murder me.
I thought he was philosopher enough to allow that there was no murder in politics.
He didn't seem to know any more about his own murder than I did.
All you have done is to make murder easy for others; to get others to do the dirty work, and then shelter them and share the gain; all you need have on your conscience is every ife that was lost with the Lady Jermyn, and every soul that lost itself in losing them.
Rook had been previously known to Cecilia's father as respectable people keeping an inn in his own neighborhood; and, finally, how they had been obliged to begin life again in domestic service, because the terrible event of a murder had given the inn a bad name, and had driven away the customers on whose encouragement their business depended.
A MAN committed a murder, and was pursued by the relations of the man whom he murdered.
This brought him into relation with queer characters, some of whom were not altogether scrupulous in their methods of making a living, murder being an acceptable means to that end.
To be brief, then, Eustace Macallan was "indicted and accused, at the instance of David Mintlaw, Esquire, Her Majesty's Advocate, for Her Majesty's interest," of the Murder of his Wife by poison, at his residence called Gleninch, in the county of Mid-Lothian.
To escape death he would have done anything, and the police agents prepared him by assuring him that he could not possibly escape conviction of murder in the first degree when his trial came off.
I must say I was surprised the jury didn't bring it in Wilful Murder against him right off.
My husband was always interested in this period of his country's history, and had already the intention of writing a story that should turn on the Appin murder.
He then related that, the morning on which the murder of poor William had been discovered, Justine had been taken ill, and confined to her bed for several days.