moving

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Related to movingly: predominantly, coyly, suspiciously, movingly expressive

move house

To relocate from one house or place of residence to another. Primarily heard in UK. We only moved house last spring, but because of Pete's new job, we're going to have to do it again next month!
See also: house, move

move the yardsticks

To alter the rules or parameters of a situation in such a way as to suit one's needs or objectives, making it more difficult for someone else to succeed, keep pace, or achieve an opposing objective. (A US variant of the more common British phrase "move the goalposts.") Primarily heard in US. I hate arguing with that type of person. As soon as you start wearing down their logic, they just move the yardsticks on the whole thing! We're never going to get the book design finished in time if the publisher keeps moving the yardsticks every couple of months like this!
See also: move

move the goal

To alter the rules or parameters of a situation in such a way as to suit one's needs or objectives, making it more difficult for someone else to succeed, keep pace, or achieve an opposing objective. (A US variant of the more common British phrase "move the goalposts.") Primarily heard in US. I hate arguing with that type of person. As soon as you start wearing down their logic, they just move the goal on the whole thing! We're never going to get the book design finished in time if the publisher keeps moving the goal every couple of months like this!
See also: goal, move

move the goal line

To alter the rules or parameters of a situation in such a way as to suit one's needs or objectives, making it more difficult for someone else to succeed, keep pace, or achieve an opposing objective. (A variant of the more common "move the goalposts.") Primarily heard in UK. I hate arguing with that type of person. As soon as you start wearing down their logic, they just move the goal line on the whole thing! We're never going to get the book design finished in time if the publisher keeps moving the goal line every couple of months like this!
See also: goal, line, move

move through the gears

To steadily increase one's momentum, as of speed, intensity, progress, or success. The home team has been training for weeks for this showdown, but they've barely had to move through the gears against such a poor performance by their opponents. With a lot of hard work and perseverance, our little business is finally starting to move through the gears!
See also: gear, move

move the/(one's) clock(s) back

To adjust the time on one's clock(s) back by one hour to account for the end of daylight saving time. Don't forget to move your clock back tonight. I hate having to move the clocks back every autumn, it's such an antiquated custom.
See also: back, move

move the/(one's) clock(s) forward

To advance the time on one's clock(s) ahead by one hour to account for the beginning of daylight saving time. Don't forget to move your clock forward tonight or you'll end up oversleeping tomorrow! I hate having to move the clocks forward every spring, it's such an antiquated custom.
See also: forward, move

move (the) deckchairs on the Titanic

To partake in or undertake some task, activity, or course of action that will ultimately prove trivial or futile in its possible effect or outcome. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. For all his blustering about overhauling the education system, the prime minister might as well have been moving the deckchairs on the Titanic for all the good these proposals will do. You're applying for arts council funding? Why don't you just move deckchairs on the Titanic while you're at it?
See also: deckchairs, move, on, titanic

get moving

to get busy; to get started; to work harder or faster. Come on, every body. Get moving! The director is coming. You had better get moving.
See also: get, moving

(I) have to be moving along.

 and (I) have to move along.
It is time for me to leave. Bill: Bye, now. Have to be movingalong. Sally: See you later. Rachel: I have to be moving along. See you later. Andrew: Bye, now. Sally: It's late. I have to move along. Mary: If you must. Good-bye. See you tomorrow.
See also: have, moving

(I'd) better get moving.

Inf. an expression announcing the need to depart. Jane: It's nearly dark. Better get moving. Mary: Okay. See you later. Bob: I'm off. Good night. Bill: Look at the time! I'd better get moving too.
See also: better, get, moving

(I've) got to get moving.

I have to leave right now. (See also (I) have to shove off for other possible variations.) Tom: Time to go. Got to get moving. Sally: Bye, Tom. Mary: It's late and I've got to get moving. Sue: Well, if you must, okay. Come again sometime. Mary: Bye.
See also: get, moving

Moving three times is as bad as a fire.

Prov. If you move your household three times, you will lose or damage as many things as a fire in your house would have destroyed or damaged. Fred: The company is transferring me again. Ellen: But we can't make another move! Moving three times is as bad as a fire.
See also: bad, fire, moving, three, times

(You'd) better get moving.

an expression encouraging someone to leave. Jane: It's nearly dark. Better get moving. Mary: Okay. I'm leaving right now. Bob: I'm off. Good night. Bill: Yes, it's late. You'd better get moving.
See also: better, get, moving

the moving spirit

  (literary)
someone who starts an important organization or course of action (often + behind ) Born in Nkroful, Ghana, he was the moving spirit behind the Charter of African States.
See also: moving, spirit
References in periodicals archive ?
The waters are the focus of Saint James's first two double-page spreads, a format that she makes use of masterfully and movingly in this book.
The book is dedicated to, and incorporates the teachings of, the hibakusha - the survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki - and he writes movingly about the lessons he has learned from the hibakusha who have been his guides, hosts, teachers, and friends during his many trips to Japan.
But gradually, and movingly, a new kind of family starts to emerge.
Anyone in any doubt should listen to Mary Laver, who told her story very movingly to this column and in a film for the False Economy site.
ANDY Murray movingly unburdening himself of the Dunblane massacre, on BBC1's The Man Behind The Racquet.
Kate McCann has spoken movingly of how she still opens and closes the curtains of her missing daughter Madeleine's bedroom six years after she disappeared.
She speaks movingly of her anguish, but has not given up hope.
A very special thank you to Fr Des, Fr Michael and Deacon Pat for the lovely service and for talking so movingly about Rosemarie and what she meant to us all.
THE tribute to Gary Ablett before the Tamworth match was impressively and movingly delivered.
Sir Michael Parkinson spoke movingly but also with humour about caring for his mum in her final years and Rodney Bickerstaffe, also spoke about the life and death of the 'incorruptible Jack Jones' who founded the Pensioners Movement when he retired in 1978.
Steve knew when to be light-hearted, but on the flipside was incredibly sensitive, not least when talking so movingly about his experience of Hillsborough.
LISTENING to Susan Boyle poignantly sing I've Dreamed A Dream and the latest talented contestant on Britain's Got Talent, Jamie Pugh, as he movingly sang Bring Him Home from the same popular LondonWest End musical, Les Miserables, will undoubtedly reawaken an interest in going to the theatre again for many of us, albeit north of the border.
THE parents of a tragic schoolboy who died after he was hit by a car today spoke movingly of the loss of their "beautiful son.
It's certainly an unusual novel, and the dual character of Ekundayo/Nat may be hard for some YAs to follow, but it vividly and movingly conveys the horror and injustice of slavery.