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blue movie

A film that contains graphic sexual content. The use of "blue" to mean lewd or indecent dates from the mid-1800s, though the origin is unclear. A lot of kids at school got in trouble for trading blue movies.
See also: blue, movie

popcorn movie

A film that is entertaining to watch but is generally not of a very high quality or rich in emotional or intellectual depth. A: "So what movie do you want to go see later?" B: "I don't feel like watching anything too heavy or complex—let's just see whatever popcorn movie is out.
See also: movie, popcorn

tentpole movie

A film with a very large budget and production value that is meant to provide substantial revenue to the production company. Big blockbusters used to be quite the rare cinematic event, but we've gotten to the point now where there's a tentpole movie coming out nearly every weekend of the year.
See also: movie, tentpole

a snuff movie

a film that is intended to be sexually exciting which shows a person being murdered In May '92 he was arrested and charged with importing snuff movies into the country.
See also: movie, snuff

B movie

The low-budget second part of a movie theater's double feature. Back in the days of double features, movie houses showed two very distinct types of films. A movies were the hits—“Gone With the Wind,” “Casablanca,” “Citizen Kane,” “The Wizard of Oz”—the ones that drew patrons to the movie houses. Then there were Westerns, horror flicks, and science fiction movies that didn't cost very much to make (they were often in black-and-white). These B movies tended to be shown before the main feature; otherwise, people would leave after the A picture and then feel they hadn't gotten their admission money's worth. As double features disappeared and the cost of filmmaking grew, the curtain went down on the B movie genre.
See also: movie

blue movie

A pornographic film. Why off-color movies were called “blue” remains a matter of conjecture. Although one definition of “blue” has been “lewd” since the 19th century, its application to movies might have referred to the 19th-century Blue Laws morality codes and state and local laws based on them, of which dirty movies would certain run afoul. Other explanations include the bluish tint of the early cheaply made black-andwhite movies, and the bluish cigarette and cigar smoke haze in rooms where men gathered to watch such films (the get-togethers were in fact known as “smokers”). “Blue” faded over the years and was replaced by “dirty movie, “adult film,” “skin flick” and “hard- or soft-core porn.”
See also: blue, movie
References in periodicals archive ?
Well, in many cases, film crews traveled just a few miles down the freeway to a nearby canyon or a working movie ranch to get that supposedly exotic look.
He is also a movie critic with the Toronto Star and co-host of Reel to Real on Rogers television.
I heard that Milla Jovovich plays a mini in this movie.
Would a movie character who refused to obey racial-segregation laws get a veto from the Hays Office?
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Beyond selectively seizing on economics and overlooking the motion-picture industry's relentless use of other media, the peremptory dismissal of TV-based movies shrugs off an even more elemental truth regarding any film adaptation, whether the source is TV or Tolstoy: The quality of a movie's source is ultimately unrelated to how it turns out on the screen.
Medved quickly caught on to the secret of success in the field of broadcast punditry: obsequious praise of movies with fat advertising budgets will land your name in big, splashy ads carried in newspapers across the country.
But Schneider holds that they can learn much from their movie counterparts.
Mimic sets a new standard in software simulation by combining the flexibility and reach of native XML; Unicode for multiple language support; our unique small-footprint movie format; and best-in-class features for simulation, recording, and editing.
MGM, the studio releasing ``Trailer,'' balked because they felt that having the ``Lucy'' movie in theaters would interfere with the film's marketing.
What could be more Canadian than a movie from a Canadian novel about a repressed young P.
Thanks mostly to the development of "multiplex' cinemas sprouting up in shopping malls across the country, the number of movie screens in America has increased in recent years.