mother

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mother

verb

mother

1. n. marijuana. (see also mother nature(’s).) She grows her own mother in a pot in her room.
2. n. a drug dealer; one’s own drug dealer upon whom one depends. (Drugs.) If you can’t trust your mother, who can you trust?
3. Go to motherfucker (sense 3).
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
In her 1997 book The Assault on Parenthood, Dana Mack writes that what she calls New Familism is found less in a return to full-time mothering than in "increasingly inventive ways parents combine work and parenting"--such as telecommuting and tag-team arrangements between fathers and mothers working different shifts.
During this section I have specifically referenced mothering in relation to parental nurturing because slave fathers are, even more often than slave mothers, generally absent figures during their children's upbringing.
Derived from one unpublished, undated, anonymous "report on preadolescent girls in a Polish neighborhood" in Chicago, which "noted that the girls there had 'the little mother spirit well-developed,' "he never considered what good mothering may have meant to the author, although it may have been no more than keeping the children clean.
Patricia Hill Collins, for instance, seeking to illustrate the type of mothering that occurs in black communities in which a network: of women care for children who are not their own, has suggested the term othermothers to incorporate these non-related women into the discussion on black families (119).
Mothers generally came to see their children in psychological terms, and their mothering continued moving toward greater attention to love and affection and efforts to reduce frustration; still, mothers experienced a great deal of worry over "spoiling" their children in the face of advice from Spock and others.
See, for example, bell hooks's essay on the political significance of the African-American domestic homeplace, Barbara Christian's essay on the significance of literary expressions of mothering and sexuality for African-American feminism, and Joanne Braxton's discussion of the outraged mother figure in Afra-American writing in The Woman That I Am: The Literary Culture of Contemporary Women of Color, ed.