more precisely

more precisely

To be more accurate; to provide better or more correct details. It seems like the political party is finally starting to gain some amount of clout in parliament, or, more precisely, they have become less marginalized and disliked. It is outrageous having to pay such an inordinate amount of money—nearly $2,000 in US dollars—simply to enter the country as a tourist.
See also: more
References in periodicals archive ?
This essay will first attempt to explain why such an acknowledgment was so unacceptable to More, for whom conscience could never be generated by a secular contrivance, or more precisely, could never be only generated by such means.
His argument, boiled down to its basics, is that a person cannot--or, perhaps more precisely, should not--believe in something but not believe in it.
While Wilson sums up the degeneration of Baron Charlus as becoming "perverse for the sake of perversity," making "viceitself" his "ideal" (156), More charts Proust's plumbing of the depths more precisely, from the level of physical desire and jealousy between men and women, to the level of "pure physical pleasure uncontaminated by sentiment" and uncomplicated by sexual differentiation (62-3), to the allegedly simpler desires to inflict pain and humiliation and to suffer them.