more in sorrow than in anger

more in sorrow than in anger

Saddened rather than infuriated by someone's behavior. For example, When Dad learned that Jack had stolen a car, he looked at him more in sorrow than in anger . This expression first appeared in 1603 in Shakespeare's Hamlet (1:2), where Horatio describes to Hamlet the appearance of his father's ghost: "A countenance more in sorrow than in anger."
See also: anger, more, sorrow
References in classic literature ?
For a moment he gazed at the dusky figures who surrounded him, more in sorrow than in anger before he spoke.