more in sorrow than in anger

more in sorrow than in anger

Saddened rather than infuriated by someone's behavior. For example, When Dad learned that Jack had stolen a car, he looked at him more in sorrow than in anger . This expression first appeared in 1603 in Shakespeare's Hamlet (1:2), where Horatio describes to Hamlet the appearance of his father's ghost: "A countenance more in sorrow than in anger."
See also: anger, more, sorrow

more in sorrow than in anger

with regret or sadness rather than with anger.
This is taken from Hamlet. When Hamlet asks Horatio to describe the expression on the face of his father's ghost, Horatio replies ‘a countenance more in sorrow than in anger’.
See also: anger, more, sorrow
References in classic literature ?
For a moment he gazed at the dusky figures who surrounded him, more in sorrow than in anger before he spoke.