moral


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Related to moral: Moral development
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moral compass

That which serves or guides a person's knowledge, sense, or intuition of correct virtues, morals, or ethics. Our country's moral compass has surely gone awry in recent times, as our priorities seem now to favor the wealthy accumulating more wealth at the expense of any other concern.
See also: compass, moral

claim the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to claim the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: claim, ground, high, moral

take the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to take the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: ground, high, moral, take

seize the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to seize the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: ground, high, moral, seize

the moral high ground

A position of moral authority or superiority that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are claimed or purported to occupy, especially in comparison to a differing viewpoint. (Used especially in the phrase "take/claim/seize/etc. the moral high ground.") The senator always tries to claim the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: ground, high, moral

moral low ground

A position of moral impropriety that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are claimed or purported to occupy, especially in comparison to a differing viewpoint. The opposite of the more common phrase "moral high ground." That is a repugnant view of this case—I can't believe you're taking the moral low ground here!
See also: ground, low, moral

moral support

Emotional or psychological support that one provides in order to give someone a feeling of confidence, encouragement, approval, or security. My dad's coming with me for moral support while I go make my complaint to the commissioner. After a breakup, it's important to surround yourself with friends and family who can give you moral support while you're feeling down.
See also: moral, support

on moral grounds

considering reasons of morality. He complained about the television program on moral gounds. There was too much ridicule of his religion.
See also: ground, moral, on

moral support

Emotional or psychological backing, as opposed to material help. For example, There's not much I can do at the doctor's office, but I'll come with you to give you moral support . [Late 1800s]
See also: moral, support

the moral high ground

COMMON If a person or organization has the moral high ground, their policies or actions are morally better than the policies or actions of their opponents. No single political party can claim the moral high ground for honesty or religious authority. When it comes to invasion of privacy, none of the newspapers can take the moral high ground. All are guilty. Compare with the high ground.
See also: ground, high, moral

(give somebody) ˌmoral supˈport

(give somebody) your friendship, encouragement, approval, etc. rather than financial or practical help: Will you stay and give me some moral support while I explain to him why I’m late?Your moral support alone isn’t enough. We need money to fund this cause.
See also: moral, support

take, claim, seize, etc. the moral ˈhigh ground

claim that your side of an argument is morally better than your opponents’ side; argue in a way that makes your side seem morally better: Don’t you try to take the moral high ground with me! You’re just as bad as I am!
See also: ground, high, moral

zipper morals

n. loose morals that lead to the easy unzipping of clothing. Ah, youth and its zipper morals!
See also: moral, zipper
References in periodicals archive ?
How we respond to these ethical challenges is in large part determined by the makeup of our moral circle.
Managers and administrators also need to be aware of the symptoms of moral distress and be prepared to help their employees work through the issues.
Gallup's question about the current state of moral values getting better or worse has been asked over the same 16-year span as the question about the overall state of moral values.
Improving Epistemological Beliefs and Moral Judgment Through an STS-Based Science Ethics Education Program, Science & Engineering Ethics, 20(1): 197-220.
Moral emotions have the same structure except that the evaluative component involves not a prudential "should" but a moral "should.
The supreme epistemic credibility of the intuitive principles such as "Murder is wrong" and "Rape is wrong" in the moral domain gives them a controlling role over all other aspects of moral inquiry.
To investigate this question, we employed a sample of MBA students ages 24 to 33, past the age at which structural brain maturation is complete, and tested their moral reasoning, then looked at the level of gray matter in the brains of a subset of subjects," said senior author Hengyi Rao, PhD, a research assistant professor of Cognitive Neuroimaging in Neurology and Psychiatry in the Perelman School of Medicine.
Colby and Damon's (1993) work on moral identity also laid important groundwork for the three recent moral identity constructs examined in this paper.
Acting on moral emotions--emotions with evaluative moral content--is a sufficient condition for acting for moral reasons.
Finally, Waller considers whether we could ever eliminate moral responsibility; perhaps it's too deeply imbedded into our psychology.
The second section of the book focuses on cognitive and motivational issues in moral psychology.
Some empirical researchers have demonstrated the relationships between personality and moral behaviors (Berry, Ones, & Sackett, 2007; Walker & Frimer, 2007).
In two experiments, one conducted in-person and the other online, participants were primed to consider a belief in either moral realism (the notion that morals are like facts) or moral antirealism (the belief that morals reflect people's preferences) during a solicitation for a charitable donation.
The two stages at this level are typical of the moral reasoning of many adults.
The debunkers claim that if moral realism is true, and if selective pressures have heavily influenced the development of our moral faculties, then we can have no moral knowledge.