moral


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Related to moral: Moral development

moral compass

That which serves or guides a person's knowledge, sense, or intuition of correct virtues, morals, or ethics. Our country's moral compass has surely gone awry in recent times, as our priorities seem now to favor the wealthy accumulating more wealth at the expense of any other concern.
See also: compass, moral

claim the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to claim the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: claim, ground, high, moral

take the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to take the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: ground, high, moral, take

seize the moral high ground

To claim, purport, or make it appear that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are morally superior to those espoused by others. The senator always tries to seize the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: ground, high, moral, seize

the moral high ground

A position of moral authority or superiority that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are claimed or purported to occupy, especially in comparison to a differing viewpoint. (Used especially in the phrase "take/claim/seize/etc. the moral high ground.") The senator always tries to claim the moral high ground during a debate so as to shift public opinion in his favor.
See also: ground, high, moral

moral low ground

A position of moral impropriety that one's arguments, beliefs, ideas, etc., are claimed or purported to occupy, especially in comparison to a differing viewpoint. The opposite of the more common phrase "moral high ground." That is a repugnant view of this case—I can't believe you're taking the moral low ground here!
See also: ground, low, moral

on moral grounds

considering reasons of morality. He complained about the television program on moral gounds. There was too much ridicule of his religion.
See also: ground, moral, on

moral support

Emotional or psychological backing, as opposed to material help. For example, There's not much I can do at the doctor's office, but I'll come with you to give you moral support . [Late 1800s]
See also: moral, support

zipper morals

n. loose morals that lead to the easy unzipping of clothing. Ah, youth and its zipper morals!
See also: moral, zipper
References in classic literature ?
Much has been blind and discreditable, but the nature of the revolution is not affected by the vices of the revolters; for this is a purely moral force.
There is not, among the most religious and instructed men of the most religious and civil nations, a reliance on the moral sentiment and a sufficient belief in the unity of things, to persuade them that society can be maintained without artificial restraints, as well as the solar system; or that the private citizen might be reasonable and a good neighbor, without the hint of a jail or a confiscation.
I suppose that man to be tried by a temptation to wickedness, out of the common; and I show, to the best of my ability, how completely the moral and mental neglect of himself, which the present material tone of public feeling in England has tacitly encouraged, leaves him at the mercy of all the worst instincts in his nature; and how surely, under those conditions, he
There is a Physical objection to the present rage for muscular exercises of all sorts, which is quite as strong, in its way, as the Moral objection.
We might add: the life of spiritual mysticism and simplicity by Wordsworth; the completely balanced life by Tennyson; and the life of moral issues and dramatic moments by Robert Browning.
The active moral impulse which Chaucer and Gower lacked, and a consequent direct confronting of the evils of the age, appear vigorously in the group of poems written during the last forty years of the century and known from the title in some of the manuscripts as 'The Vision of William Concerning Piers the Plowman.
Dispense with all the moral courage you can," I said briskly.
I know,--I can see it--you have, among other ways, been used to managing people with your eyes, letting your moral courage speak out through them, as it were.
He represented the moral strength of a beautiful reticence that could vanquish all the deplorable crudities of life--fear, disaster, sin--even death itself.
He waved his arm once, and three exact replicas of his face, of his clothes, of his dull severity, of his solemn grief, repeated the wide gesture that in its comprehensive sweep indicated an infinity of moral sweetness, embraced the walls, the hangings, the whole house, all the crowd of houses outside, all the flimsy and inscrutable graves of the living, with their doors numbered like the doors of prison-cells, and as impenetrable as the granite of tombstones.
This is merely the moral view of the subject; as to the more exact and geological--"
Merely that it has not been so long known in morals, as the other countries of Christendom.
I am solely to blame for the thing having come to this - and - and, I cannot say,' he added, rather hard up for a general peroration, 'that I have any sanguine expectation of ever becoming a moral sort of fellow, or that I have any belief in any moral sort of fellow whatever.
The moral influence of these objects, in forming the domestic virtues, may have an immense influence upon me; not upon you, for you are a hopeless case, but upon me.
But though he had, as we have said, formed his morals on the Platonic model, yet he perfectly agreed with the opinion of Aristotle, in considering that great man rather in the quality of a philosopher or a speculatist, than as a legislator.