monopoly

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have a monopoly on (something)

To be the only one who has or possesses something. If that company thinks that they can have a monopoly on telephone service, they're in for a rude awakening!
See also: have, monopoly, on

Monopoly money

1. A sum of money that has little or no importance to a person. A reference to the paper play money used in the board game Monopoly. He dropped nearly 30 grand on a single watch, but he's so loaded that it's just Monopoly money to him
2. Bills of currency that is printed on bright, multicolored paper. (In contrast to the simple green and white color of American currency.) Even after four years, I could never get used to the Monopoly money they use up in Canada.
See also: money, monopoly
References in periodicals archive ?
prohibited government-granted monopolies in their state constitutions,
Zurabyan pointed out that the monopolies existing in the country are the result of the Government's criminal activities.
The European Gambling Market after the Gambelli case - do gambling monopolies still focus on limiting gambling behaviour or will they lose their status as monopolies?
At a time when Cablevision's own business is in disarray, it is clear that its intentions are solely to prevent the Jets from developing an arena that could compete with Cablevision's monopolies and in doing so placed in jeopardy Jet fans' rights to have a home field, hundreds of millions of dollars of tax revenue for New York City and thousands of jobs for New Yorkers.
Public-interest advocates don't want to risk releasing power to the monopolies built up by past legislation.
Many of the complaints about Standard came from medium-sized refiners that lost cozy local monopolies to Standard's rationalizing and price cutting.
Monopolies have to play by special rules and the law bars them from using their power to gain an edge in a new industry.
That law mandated that phone monopolies such as Qwest and SBC allow other companies wholesale access to the "public switched network," thus allowing consumers to choose among phone companies for their service.
Unfortunately, this same price decline has not occurred in the protected regional local telephone monopolies.
It illustrated how new technology and consumer demand are transforming telecommunications, overcoming barriers to competition, and undermining old monopolies.
That law had mandated that phone monopolies such as Qwest and SBC allow other companies wholesale access to the "public switched network," thus allowing consumers to choose among phone companies for their service.
And, of course, private companies without legally protected monopolies can't just raise their prices when costs climb.
The circuit court's ruling exemplifies yet another in the seemingly unending supply of delay tactics by the regional phone monopolies to delay benefits of competition in local phone service to American consumers.
Franchise rules and entry regulation shore up existing monopolies.