mirror

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do it with mirrors

1. To do or perform something (especially a magic trick) by using an optical illusion. Everyone was astounded when he appeared to levitate off the ground, but I'm pretty sure he just did it with mirrors.
2. To do something in a highly secretive, illusory, or inexplicable way, likened to that of a magic trick. The military operation was completely unseen, completely unnoticed by anybody, as if they did it with mirrors. The company's CEO managed to swindle his clients out of millions of dollars, doing it with mirrors so that no one would notice the disappearance of the money until it was too late.
See also: mirror

able to fog a mirror

Alive, perhaps barely. (If one holds up a mirror to one's nose or mouth, the breath will cause fog to appear.) I spent the whole day moving furniture, so I'm barely able to fog a mirror now. He'll date any woman who's able to fog a mirror.
See also: able, fog, mirror

smoke and mirrors

Trickery, deception, or misdirection. The candidate has been accused of using smoke and mirrors during the debate to undermine the credibility of his opponent. Before computer generated effects, filmmakers had to use a lot of smoke and mirrors to make fantastic, unbelievable things look realistic in their movies.
See also: and, mirror, smoke

all done with mirrors

Done using trickery, deception, or misdirection. Before computer generated effects, fantastic, unbelievable things in movies were all done with mirrors.
See also: all, done, mirror

able to fog a mirror

Fig. Inf. alive, even if just barely. (Usually jocular. Alludes to the use of a small mirror placed under the nose to tell if a person is breathing or not. (Able to can be replaced with can.) Look, I don't need an athlete to do this job! Anybody able to fog a mirror will do fine!
See also: able, fog, mirror

smoke and mirrors

deception and confusion. (Said of statements or more complicated rhetoric used to mislead people rather than inform. Alludes to the way a magician uses optical illusion to create believability while performing a trick. Fixed order.) Most people know that the politician was just using smoke and mirrors to make things look better than they really were. Her report was little more than smoke and mirrors. No one will believe any of it.
See also: and, mirror, smoke

smoke and mirrors

Smoke and mirrors are words and actions that are intended to deceive or confuse people, especially by making something seem better than it really is. The president claims that his economic plan is free of the smoke and mirrors of previous presidential budget proposals. Thousands of shareholders learned too late that the company's image of success had been created with smoke and mirrors. Note: Magicians sometimes use smoke and mirrors when they are performing tricks, in order to confuse or deceive people.
See also: and, mirror, smoke

all done with mirrors

achieved with an element of trickery.
This phrase alludes to the fact that conjuring tricks are often explained as being achieved through the skilful use of mirrors; compare with smoke and mirrors (at smoke).
See also: all, done, mirror

smoke and mirrors

the obscuring or embellishing of the truth of a situation with misleading or irrelevant information. chiefly North American
1998 Sunday Telegraph Ministers accused the Conservatives of a ‘smoke and mirrors’ con trick.
See also: and, mirror, smoke

smoke and ˈmirrors

used to describe ways of tricking people or of hiding the truth: He said the government had used smoke and mirrors to raise taxes.The commission has declared war on the smoke and mirrors of sales promotions.
See also: and, mirror, smoke

done by mirrors

and done with mirrors
mod. illusory; accomplished in a way that is purposefully deceptive. He’s not really smart. It’s all done by mirrors. The whole budgetary process is done with mirrors.
See also: by, done, mirror

done with mirrors

verb
See also: done, mirror

smoke and mirrors

n. a strategy of deception and cover up. Her entire report was nothing but smoke and mirrors. Who could believe any of it?
See also: and, mirror, smoke

smoke and mirrors

Something that deceives or distorts the truth: Your explanation is nothing but smoke and mirrors.
See also: and, mirror, smoke
References in periodicals archive ?
But there's one element you might have overlooked that could magically enhance the space and add more light - mirrors.
In previous studies, only a few species--people, great apes, and dolphins--reliably attend to marks on themselves that are visible only in mirrors.
This ensures that all mirrors remain synchronized and the file system of the host(s) remains synchronized with the data on the minors.
Lavish accessories - from beaded lamp shades to velvet or silk throw pillows to elegant mirrors - are this fall's hot buys.
Against the musical background of soprano Mirella Freni singing an aria from Verdi's Simon Boccanegra, one wandered though corridors formed by structures of fine, transparent, floating scrims on which images were projected and distorted by large mirrors at different points in the path--mirrors that also reflected us, as we grappled physically and mentally with the images and associations they provoked, concretely illustrating one aspect of the mind/body problem, a key point in Morris's process.
One-way mirrors contain 50 to 75 percent less silver nitrate.
The passing Negro becomes, in Johnson's novel and in other African American literature of the same period, the conscious, speaking center of what for the rest of the world is a largely unconscious effort to mark the borders of race, class, and self; his struggles with self-definition, with class and race consciousness as both internalized and articulated, are themselves mirrors for the racialized American dialogue of identity that surrounds him.
com/research/ttxbl9/smart_mirrors) has announced the addition of the "Smart Mirrors Markets - 2013" report to their offering.
VINTAGE elegance is a trademark of the Old French Mirror Company, which sources 19th-century mirrors from chateaux and manor houses.
The new study convincingly shows that capuchins get "weirded out" by seeing themselves in mirrors and don't treat such images as they do strangers, remarks anthropologist Dean Falk of Florida State University in Tallahassee.
Mirrors can be local or remotely located, that is, inside or outside the same disk subsystems.
That we understand as part of the natural uncanniness of mirrors.
4-meter mirrors about 3-1/2 inches thick for the Large Binocular Telescope.
Later, SSG Tinsley in California will polish and test the mirrors.
An investigator of pattern recognition and an amateur artist, he's on a mission to scientifically disprove the assertion by renowned British-born artist David Hockney that many of Europe's greatest artists of the 15th and 16th centuries secretly used mirrors or lenses to project traceable images onto their canvases and thereby achieve the arresting realism of their paintings.