merry


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merry-andrew

1. adjective Amusingly foolish or idiotic; of or characterized by clownish behavior or sensibilities, especially in public. Though at first I found him quite funny, Tommy's merry-andrew routine has grown quite tiresome lately.
2. noun A person who acts like a clown or buffoon in public, especially for the amusement of others; a fool or idiot in general. I know you enjoy the attention that being a merry-andrew brings, but if you act like a fool all the time, people will start believing you actually are one.

eat, drink, and be merry

A call for others to enjoy themselves, usually in the context of a party or other festive gathering. Come on, people, this is a party—eat, drink, and be merry!
See also: and, merry

in merry pin

Happy; in good spirits. I'm glad to see my sister in merry pin on our vacation because she's usually so stressed out these days.
See also: merry, pin

merry dance

A deliberate waste of time. She led me on a merry dance as she tried to explain why she missed our meeting.
See also: dance, merry

Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die.

Prov. Enjoy yourself whenever you can, because you may die soon. ("Eat, drink, and be merry" by itself is simply a way of encouraging people to enjoy themselves.) Fred: No cake for me, thank you. I'm on a diet. Jane: But, Fred, this is a birthday party. Eat, drink, and be merry. Natasha encouraged all her guests to eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die.
See also: and, die, tomorrow, we

lead someone on a merry chase

Fig. to lead someone in a purposeless pursuit. What a waste of time. You really led me on a merry chase. Jane led Bill on a merry chase trying to find an antique lamp.
See also: chase, lead, merry, on

make merry

to have fun; to have an enjoyable time. The guests certainly made merry at the wedding. The children were making merry in the backyard.
See also: make, merry

*merry as a cricket

 and *merry as the day is long
very happy and carefree. (*Also: as ~.) Mary is as merry as a cricket whenever she has company come to call. The little children are as merry as the day is long.
See also: cricket, merry

more the merrier

Cliché the more people there are, the happier the situation will be. Of course you can have a ride with us! The more the merrier. The manager hired a new employee even though there's not enough work for all of us now. Oh, well, the more the merrier.
See also: merry, more

the more the merrier

additional people will make something better “Do you mind if I invite my sister and her family?” “Why not? The more the merrier.”
See also: merry, more

The more the merrier.

something that you say which means you are happy for other people to join your group in an activity 'Do you mind if Ann comes to the cinema with us?' 'Not at all. The more the merrier.'
See more by accident than design, There is more to than meets the eye, More fool !, have [done etc.] more than has had hot dinners, What more do you want - jam on it?, It's more than my job's worth, more by luck than judgement, bite off more than can chew, More power to your elbow!
See also: merry, more

lead a chase

Also, lead a merry chase or dance . Mislead someone; waste someone's time. For example, Mary refuses to commit herself and is leading John a merry chase, or Harry led us all a dance; we were waiting at the hotel and he'd gone to the movies. [First half of 1500s]
See also: chase, lead

more the merrier, the

The larger the number involved, the better the occasion. For example, John's invited all his family to come along, and why not? The more the merrier. This expression was first recorded in 1530, when it was put as "The more the merrier; the fewer, the better fare" (meaning "with fewer there would be more to eat"), an observation that made its way into numerous proverb collections.
See also: more
References in classic literature ?
This wedlock was more serious than most affairs of Merry Mount, where jest and delusion, trick and fantasy, kept up a continual carnival.
Begin you the stave, reverend Sir," cried they all; "and never did the woods ring to such a merry peal as we of the Maypole shall send up
Early the next morning, a gleam of his merry humor returned, on finding that his wounded limb retained its natural proportions.
At first the thing was merry and pleasant enough; but when it had gone on a while, and there seemed to be no end of playing or dancing, they began to cry out, and beg him to leave off; but he stopped not a whit the more for their entreaties, till the judge not only gave him his life, but promised to return him the hundred florins.
Selfridge Merry, installed in the honorary arm-chairs tacitly reserved for them, paused to listen to the younger man's philippic.
Selfridge Merry looked genuinely alarmed, and an expression of pain and disgust settled on Mr.
Besides this, they swore never to harm a child nor to wrong a woman, be she maid, wife, or widow; so that, after a while, when the people began to find that no harm was meant to them, but that money or food came in time of want to many a poor family, they came to praise Robin and his merry men, and to tell many tales of him and of his doings in Sherwood Forest, for they felt him to be one of themselves.
Up rose Robin Hood one merry morn when all the birds were singing blithely among the leaves, and up rose all his merry men, each fellow washing his head and hands in the cold brown brook that leaped laughing from stone to stone.
Her gleesome voice and merry laugh were the sweetest music of their home.
The noise of soft voices in conversation, and of merry laughter, fell upon his ears ere he had advanced many paces; and raising his eyes higher than was his humble wont, he descried, at no great distance, the five sisters seated on the grass, with Alice in the centre: all busily plying their customary task of embroidering.
Maybe not; but we'd a merry time of it, too, though mingled with sorrow and pain, as Lowborough knows to his cost - Ha, ha
The storm swooped down, enveloped him and the haycock on which he was lying, and the other haycocks, and the wagon-loads, and the whole meadow and distant fields all seemed to be shaking and singing to the measures of this wild merry song with its shouts and whistles and clapping.
All that was drowned in a sea of merry common labor.
A weakness on his part, which affords the narrative an opportunity of relieving the reader from suspense, in behalf of the two young pupils of the Merry Old Gentleman; and of recording--
The noise of footsteps on the creaking stairs, a few minutes after the occurrence of this conversation, roused the merry old gentleman as he sat over the fire with a saveloy and a small loaf in his hand; a pocket-knife in his right; and a pewter pot on the trivet.