merry

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merry-andrew

1. adjective Amusingly foolish or idiotic; of or characterized by clownish behavior or sensibilities, especially in public. Though at first I found him quite funny, Tommy's merry-andrew routine has grown quite tiresome lately.
2. noun A person who acts like a clown or buffoon in public, especially for the amusement of others; a fool or idiot in general. I know you enjoy the attention that being a merry-andrew brings, but if you act like a fool all the time, people will start believing you actually are one.

eat, drink, and be merry

A call for others to enjoy themselves, usually in the context of a party or other festive gathering. Come on, people, this is a party—eat, drink, and be merry!
See also: and, merry

in merry pin

Happy; in good spirits. I'm glad to see my sister in merry pin on our vacation because she's usually so stressed out these days.
See also: merry, pin

merry dance

A deliberate waste of time. She led me on a merry dance as she tried to explain why she missed our meeting.
See also: dance, merry

eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die

A call for others to enjoy themselves, usually in the context of a party or other festive gathering. The phrase is often shortened to "eat, drink, and be merry." Come on, people, this is a party—eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die!
See also: and, die, tomorrow, we

lead (one) (on) a merry dance

To waste someone's time or cause someone a great deal of confusion through deceitful, manipulative, or inexplicable behavior. You should have just said you weren't interested in investing from the beginning, rather than leading us on a merry dance for three weeks! If someone in whom you are uninterested is pursuing you romantically, do not lead them a merry dance—make your feelings clear from the get go.
See also: dance, lead, merry

play (merry) hell with (someone or something)

informal To cause issues or disruptions for someone or something. This wonky Internet signal is playing merry hell with my site edits right now.
See also: hell, play

Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die.

Prov. Enjoy yourself whenever you can, because you may die soon. ("Eat, drink, and be merry" by itself is simply a way of encouraging people to enjoy themselves.) Fred: No cake for me, thank you. I'm on a diet. Jane: But, Fred, this is a birthday party. Eat, drink, and be merry. Natasha encouraged all her guests to eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die.
See also: and, die, tomorrow, we

lead someone on a merry chase

Fig. to lead someone in a purposeless pursuit. What a waste of time. You really led me on a merry chase. Jane led Bill on a merry chase trying to find an antique lamp.
See also: chase, lead, merry, on

make merry

to have fun; to have an enjoyable time. The guests certainly made merry at the wedding. The children were making merry in the backyard.
See also: make, merry

*merry as a cricket

 and *merry as the day is long
very happy and carefree. (*Also: as ~.) Mary is as merry as a cricket whenever she has company come to call. The little children are as merry as the day is long.
See also: cricket, merry

more the merrier

Cliché the more people there are, the happier the situation will be. Of course you can have a ride with us! The more the merrier. The manager hired a new employee even though there's not enough work for all of us now. Oh, well, the more the merrier.
See also: merry, more

lead a chase

Also, lead a merry chase or dance . Mislead someone; waste someone's time. For example, Mary refuses to commit herself and is leading John a merry chase, or Harry led us all a dance; we were waiting at the hotel and he'd gone to the movies. [First half of 1500s]
See also: chase, lead

more the merrier, the

The larger the number involved, the better the occasion. For example, John's invited all his family to come along, and why not? The more the merrier. This expression was first recorded in 1530, when it was put as "The more the merrier; the fewer, the better fare" (meaning "with fewer there would be more to eat"), an observation that made its way into numerous proverb collections.
See also: more

lead someone a merry dance

BRITISH
If someone leads you a merry dance while you are trying to achieve something, they cause a lot of problems for you, often by doing something to trick you. They had led the Irish Government a merry dance for the last seven months. Note: You can also say that someone leads you a dance or leads you a merry chase. I began to court the lady who last year became my second wife. She led me quite a dance, but I never gave up. He was fast becoming a kind of cult figure, always leading the police a merry chase.
See also: dance, lead, merry

play hell

or

play merry hell

mainly BRITISH
If someone plays hell or plays merry hell, they cause trouble by behaving badly or complaining a lot. I went to the school and played hell with them. She played merry hell and stormed out in a rage. Note: Verbs such as kick up, raise or create can be used instead of play. I will be raising merry hell at the meeting tomorrrow.
See also: hell, play

play hell with something

or

play merry hell with something

mainly BRITISH
If one thing plays hell with another or plays merry hell with another, the first thing has a bad effect on the second one or causes great confusion. Divorce and remarriage play hell with property and inheritance law. Slugs play merry hell with growing plants.
See also: hell, play, something
References in periodicals archive ?
Ballard Designs, Frontgate, Grandin Road, Chasing Fireflies, Garnet Hill, Improvements, HSN and TravelSmith are collaborating to create the ultimate More the Merrier holiday Pinterest board with products pinned from each of the brands.
From November 1 through the end of the year, shoppers seeking holiday help for a merrier season, including gift ideas, party themes and stress-free shopping tips can go to www.
The more the merrier - although I'm far happier posing for a publicity photo than I would be running 26 miles
It's free, so why not come along, the more the merrier.
IT'S always pleasing to report on the arrival of a new chippy - the more the merrier if they're any good
As she says, the more the merrier in this vital debate.
CELEBRATIONS were all the merrier for a North East woman who scooped a massive cash prize at the bingo.
Since the initial delivery of trees, Lo Re has concluded the more Joshuas the merrier.
But it is worth remembering, unlike with real fruits and vegetables, when it comes to supplements it is not always a case of the more the merrier
Local councils believe the extended hours are the wrong way to go, but need to be given good reasons to turn down any application ( and the more, the merrier.
As the evening progressed, triumphant fans got merrier and merrier but still Jan, from Basingstoke, Hampshire, waited.
Forget boy meets girl or family sitcoms, today's television audiences are demanding group-based shows and it appears that the more on offer, the merrier.
But a festive supporting cast including Beverly D'Angelo, Randy Quaid, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Juliette Lewis and Doris Roberts, 25,000 lights on the roof, an exploding turkey on the dining room table and a SWAT team taking siege outside soon help Clark realize that more does not always mean merrier.
GUINNESS makers Diageo say that British people knocking back their favourite spirits has led to merrier European sales.
Guinness maker Diageo said that British people knocking back their favourite spirits had led to merrier European sales.