mention

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come to mention it

An expression used when one remembers or realizes something because of what the other person has just said. An abbreviated form of the full phrase "now that you have come to mention it." A: "The weather's been a bit unpredictable lately, huh?" B: "Come to mention it, I hear there could be a blizzard next week." A: "I hate filling out these tax forms." B: "Come to mention it, I don't think I ever filed my taxes last year!"
See also: come, mention

now (that) you mention it

An expression used when one remembers or realizes something because of what the other person has just said. A: "The weather's been a bit unpredictable lately, huh?" B: "Now you mention it, I hear there could be a blizzard next week." A: "I hate filling out these tax forms." B: "Now that you mention it, I don't think I ever filed my taxes last year!"
See also: mention, now

honorable mention

A recognition or citation of merit given to a contestant, exhibition, entry, etc., in a competition despite that person or thing not being awarded a prize or top honor. Primarily heard in US. My short story did not win a top place in the writing competition, but being given an honorable mention still gives me great pride.
See also: mention

don't mention it

It was no big deal. Usually said in response to "thank you." A: "Thanks so much for saving me a seat." B: "Don't mention it!"
See also: mention

mention (something) in passing

To say something, casually or as an aside, during a conversation. It wasn't the main focus of our discussion—he only mentioned it in passing. Karen mentioned the party in passing the other day, but she didn't go into detail.
See also: mention, passing

you're welcome

A response to "thank you" or "thanks" meaning that one was glad to do it and would do it again. A: "Thanks for picking up that package for me." B: "Oh, you're welcome."
See also: welcome

not to mention

In addition to or as well as what's been discussed. I've already got to spend three hours in the car running errands, not to mention the hour and a half it will take to pick up the kids from school. They have two massive houses in the city, not to mention their vacation home by the beach.
See also: mention, not

Don't mention it.

You are welcome and your thanks are not necessary. A: Thank you so much! B: Don't mention it.
See also: mention

(I) just want(ed) to say something.

 and (I) just want(ed) to mention something.; (I) just want(ed) to tell you something.
a sentence opener that eases into a statement or question. (Can be followed by words like say, ask, tell you, be, and come.) Rachel: I just wanted to say that we all loved your letter. Thank you so much. Andrew: Thanks. Glad you liked it. Rachel: I just wanted to tell you how sorry l am about your sister. Alice: Thanks. I appreciate it. Andrew: Just wanted to come by for a minute and say hello. Tom: Well, hello. Glad you dropped by.
See also: just, say, want

make mention of someone or something

to mention someone or something. Did you have to make mention of Sally? I'm angry with her. I will have to make mention of your failure to secure additional business.
See also: make, mention, of

mention someone or something in passing

to mention someone or something casually; to mention someone or something while talking about someone or something else. He just happened to mention in passing that the mayor had resigned. John mentioned in passing that he was nearly eighty years old.
See also: mention, passing

mention someone or something in something

 
1. to name someone or something in a particular context. We mentioned you in regard to nominations for the congress. Everyone mentioned your book in the discussions.
2. to name someone or something in a will, lecture, story, article, etc. They mentioned your name in the discussion. Uncle Herman mentioned you in his will.
See also: mention

mention something to someone

to refer to something while talking to someone. Please mention it to your father. You had better not mention that to anyone.
See also: mention

not worth mentioning

 
1. not important enough to require a comment. There are others, but they are not worth mentioning. A small number of books hint at the phenomenon, but they aren't worth mentioning.
2. [of an error or wrong] not worth apologizing for. This isn't a problem at all. It's not worth mentioning. No need to apologize to me. No harm done. It's not worth mentioning.
See also: mention, not, worth

don't mention it

see under you're welcome.
See also: mention

not to mention

Also, not to speak of; to say nothing of. In addition to, besides what's already been said. For example, I don't think the voters will want that big program, not to mention the cost, or Dave teaches trumpet and trombone, not to speak of other brass instruments, or Their house is worth at least a million, to say nothing of their other assets.
See also: mention, not

you're welcome

Also, don't mention it. No thanks are needed, I was glad to do it. For example, Thanks for picking me up.-You're welcome, or I appreciate what you did for Mother.-Don't mention it. Both phrases are polite formulas for responding to thanks. The first dates from about 1900; the variant was first recorded in 1841. For synonyms, see forget it; no problem, def. 2. Also see welcome to.
See also: welcome

be mentioned in dispatches

be commended for your actions. British
In official military reports from the front line any soldiers who have been responsible for particular acts of bravery are commended by name.
See also: dispatch, mention

don’t ˈmention it

(spoken) used as a polite reply when a person thanks you: ‘Thanks — that’s very kind!’ ‘Don’t mention it.’
See also: mention

mention somebody/something in the same ˈbreath

compare a person or thing with another much better person or thing: How can you mention the Beatles and the Spice Girls in the same breath?

not to mention something

used to introduce extra information and emphasize what you are saying: He’s got a house in London and a cottage in the country, not to mention the villa in Spain.
See also: mention, not, something

you’re ˈwelcome

(especially American English) used as a polite reply when a person thanks you: ‘Thanks for your help.’ ‘You’re welcome.’
See also: welcome

not to mention

In addition to; as well as.
See also: mention, not
References in classic literature ?
One great convenience of the new method of going on pilgrimage I must not forget to mention.
It may have nothing to do with what came afterwards, but I thought it only right to mention it.
The view it commands of Cook's Court at one end (not to mention a squint into Cursitor Street) and of Coavinses' the sheriff's officer's backyard at the other she regards as a prospect of unequalled beauty.
Thus, when reading in my deck chair or when talking with others, practically any mention of any part of the world I knew instantly aroused the connotation of drinking and good fellows.
It is apparent that Avis Everhard completed the Manuscript during the last days of preparation for the Second Revolt; hence the fact that there is no mention of the disastrous outcome of the Second Revolt.
In the first place attempts have been made to show that "Hesiod" is a significant name and therefore fictitious: it is only necessary to mention Goettling's derivation from IEMI to ODOS (which would make `Hesiod' mean the
If she mentions it, beg her pardon, and tell her you won't press the question any more.
255) mentions red water off Lima, apparently produced by the same cause.
I should like to know if there is anything particular in either of these that you would like to mention.
It is strange," replied Elinor, in a most painful perplexity, "that I should never have heard him even mention your name.
She had felt unwilling to mention her suspicions to Miss Garth, until those suspicions had been confirmed -- and she now recoiled, with even greater reluctance, from allowing her daughters to be in any way alarmed about her.
Mirabel to introduce me, and to mention the date of my return.
Partridge still persisted in asserting his innocence, though he admitted he had made the above-mentioned confession; which he however endeavoured to account for, by protesting that he was forced into it by the continued importunity she used: who vowed, that, as she was sure of his guilt, she would never leave tormenting him till he had owned it; and faithfully promised, that, in such case, she would never mention it to him more.
My mistress had noticed, from the time when the police first came into the house, that the bare mention of him was enough to set Miss Rachel's temper in a flame.
I can only explain," replied Miss Halcombe, "by entering into certain particulars, connected with my sister's marriage- engagement, which I did not think it necessary or desirable to mention to you this morning.