mend

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Related to mends: amends

hell mend (one)

An exclamation showing one's anger or irritation with someone else. I can't believe he stole my idea—hell mend him!
See also: hell, mend

It is never too late to mend.

Prov. It is never too late to apologize for something you have done or try to repair something you have done wrong. Sue: I still miss Tony, but it's been a year since our big fight and we haven't spoken to each other since. Mother: Well, it's never too late to mend; why don't you call him up and apologize?
See also: late, mend, never

mend

 (one's) fences
1. Lit. to repair fences as part of one's chores. Tom is mending fences today at the south end of the ranch.
2. Fig. to restore good relations (with someone). I think I had better get home and mend my fences. I had an argument with my daughter this morning. Sally called up her uncle to apologize and try to mend fences.

mend one's ways

Fig. to improve one's behavior. John used to be very wild, but he's mended his ways. You'll have to mend your ways if you go out with Mary. She hates people to be late.
See also: mend, way

on the mend

getting better; becoming healthy again. I cared for my father while he was on the mend. I took a leave of absence from work while I was on the mend.
See also: mend, on

mend (your) fences

to repair a relationship with someone The mayor is trying to mend fences with members of the city council so they will approve his plan.
See also: fence, mend

on the mend

getting better after an illness, injury, or a bad period He's on the mend and walking a mile a day after a mild heart attack. With fewer people out of work, the economy is clearly on the mend.
See also: mend, on

change your ways

also mend your ways
to improve your behavior If he wants to continue living here, he's going to have to change his ways.
See also: change, way

make do and mend

  (British old-fashioned)
to manage with less than you would like, by repairing old things instead of buying new ones Our family never had any new furniture. We just had to make do and mend.
See also: and, make, mend

be on the mend

if you are on the mend, your health is improving after an illness He's still a bit tired but he's definitely on the mend.
See also: mend, on

mend (your) fences

to try to become friendly again with someone after an argument (usually + with ) China is trying to mend fences with Russia after the recent border dispute.
See change ways
See also: fence, mend

change/mend your ways

to improve the way in which you behave If he wants to carry on living here, he's going to have to change his ways.
See also: change, way

mend one's fences

Improve poor relations; placate personal, political, or business contacts. For example, The senator always goes home weekends and spends time mending his fences. This metaphoric expression dates from an 1879 speech by Senator John Sherman in Mansfield, Ohio, to which he said he had returned "to look after my fences." Although he may have meant literally to repair the fences around his farm there, media accounts of the speech took him to mean campaigning among his constituents. In succeeding decades the term was applied to nonpolitical affairs as well.
See also: fence, mend

mend one's ways

Improve one's behavior, as in Threatened with suspension, Jerry promised to mend his ways. This expression, transferring a repair of clothes to one of character, was first recorded in 1868, but 150 or so years earlier it had appeared as mend one's manners.
See also: mend, way

on the mend

Recovering one's health, as in I heard you had the flu, but I'm glad to see you're on the mend. This idiom uses mend in the sense of "repair." [c. 1800]
See also: mend, on

mend fences

To improve poor relations, especially in politics: "Whatever thoughts he may have entertained about mending some fences with [them] were banished" (Conor Cruise O'Brien).
See also: fence, mend

on the mend

Improving, especially in health.
See also: mend, on
References in classic literature ?
Don't fret; I'll come down and mend it in the night," he said.
Well, I am glad of that,' said the Miller, clapping little Hans on the back, 'for I want you to come up to the mill as soon as you are dressed, and mend my barn-roof for me.
But the kindness of the ladies of the town did not end here, for when they came to understand that I was no more maintained by the public allowance as before, they gave me money oftener than formerly; and as I grew up they brought me work to do for them, such as linen to make, and laces to mend, and heads to dress up, and not only paid me for doing them, but even taught me how to do them; so that now I was a gentlewoman indeed, as I understood that word, I not only found myself clothes and paid my nurse for my keeping, but got money in my pocket too beforehand.
The ladies also gave me clothes frequently of their own or their children's; some stockings, some petticoats, some gowns, some one thing, some another, and these my old woman managed for me like a mere mother, and kept them for me, obliged me to mend them, and turn them and twist them to the best advantage, for she was a rare housewife.
The independent study conducted by a team at University College London Institute of Child Health (ICH) demonstrates the success of the weight management program MEND for overweight and obese children and their families.
116 children aged between 8 and 12 years took part in the study, which involved attending a nine week MEND program, followed by the provision of 12 weeks of free family swimming between January 2005 and January 2007.
A key strength of the MEND Program was its acceptability to families--all the children who started the program completed it.
The MEND Program is now being piloted and made available in the United States through the MEND Foundation (www.