memory

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long memory

A clear memory of events that happened long ago. My grandma has a long memory of her childhood in Russia. It's astonishing hearing how things were when she was young! I always have a long memory for people who disrespect me. Once you're in my bad books, you're there forever!
See also: long, memory

have a long memory

To have a clear memory of events that happened long ago. My grandma has a long memory of her childhood in Russia. It's astonishing hearing how things were when she was young! I always have a long memory for people who disrespect me. Once you're in my bad books, you're there forever!
See also: have, long, memory

memory lane

A set or series of memories of one's past life, likened to a roadway that one may visit or take a tour of. (Used primarily in the phrase "stroll/take a trip/walk etc. down memory lane.") My grandmother spends more time strolling down memory lane these days than conversing about the present. It was lovely finding our old photo albums and taking a trip down memory lane. To be quite honest, it's growing quite dull doing nothing but re-visiting memory lane when I get together with my high school friends.
See also: lane, memory

stroll down memory lane

To reminisce over memories of past events, especially happy ones. My grandmother spends more time strolling down memory lane these days than talking about the present. Sarah: "How did your coffee date with John go?" Amy: "It was pretty amicable, actually. We strolled down memory lane for a while, and then we went our separate ways."
See also: down, lane, memory, stroll

walk down memory lane

To reminisce over memories of past events, especially happy ones. My grandmother spends more time walking down memory lane these days than talking about the present. Sarah: "How did your coffee date with John go?" Amy: "It was pretty amicable, actually. We walked down memory lane for a while, and then we went our separate ways."
See also: down, lane, memory, walk

take a trip down memory lane

To reminisce over memories of past events, especially happy ones. My grandmother spends more time taking trips down memory lane these days than talking about the present. Sarah: "How did your coffee date with John go?" Amy: "It was pretty amicable, actually. We took a trip down memory lane for a while, and then we went our separate ways."
See also: down, lane, memory, take, trip

take a walk down memory lane

To reminisce over memories of past events, especially happy ones. My grandmother spends more time taking walks down memory lane these days than talking about the present. Sarah: "How did your coffee date with John go?" Amy: "It was pretty amicable, actually. We took a walk down memory lane for a while, and then we went our separate ways."
See also: down, lane, memory, take, walk

commit something to memory

to memorize something. Do we have to commit this poem to memory? The dress rehearsal of the play is tomorrow night. Please make sure you have committed all your lines to memory by that time.
See also: commit, memory

enshrine someone in one's heart

 and enshrine someone's memory in one's heart
Fig. to keep the memory of someone in a special place in one's heart or mind. Bob enshrined Jill's memory in his heart.
See also: enshrine, heart

freeze someone or something in one's memory

Fig. to preserve the image of someone or something in one's memory. I tried to freeze her in my memory so I would have her with me always. I froze the scene in my memory.
See also: freeze, memory

if my memory serves me correctly

Fig. if I have remembered it correctly... If my memory serves me correctly, you are the cousin of my closest friend.
See also: if, memory, serve

in memory of someone

to continue the good memories of someone; for the honor of a deceased person. Many streets were renamed in memory of John F. Kennedy. We planted roses in memory of my deceased father.
See also: memory, of

in recent memory

Fig. the period of time in which things are still remembered and discussed. Never in recent memory has there been this much snow! I haven't been this happy in recent memory!
See also: memory

jog someone's memory

Fig. to stimulate someone's memory to recall something. Hearing the first part of the song I'd forgotten really jogged my memory. DI tried to jog Bill's memory about our childhood antics.
See also: jog, memory

know something from memory

to have memorized something so that one does not have to consult a written version; to know something well from seeing it very often. (Almost the same as know something by heart.) Mary didn't need the script because she knew the play from memory. The conductor went through the entire concert without sheet music. He knew it from memory.
See also: know, memory

in living memory

also within living memory
able to be remembered by people who are alive now Water levels on the Mississippi River haven't been this high in living memory.
See also: living, memory

commit to memory something

also commit something to memory
to study something in order to make yourself remember it If you want to learn a language well, you have to commit to memory long lists of vocabulary and grammatical rules. The boys read the holy book several times, committing it to memory.
See also: commit, memory

if memory serves

if I am remembering correctly If memory serves, there will be flags and parades for the Olympic opening ceremonies.
See also: if, memory, serve

in memory of somebody

also in somebody's memory
in order to honor someone who has died and to help people remember them A service was held in memory of the earthquake victims. Donations can be made to the Heart Association in Diane's memory.
See also: memory, of

jog your memory

to cause you to remember something I use the photos to remind me of what I've seen, to jog my memory.
See also: jog, memory

refresh your memory

to help you to remember something McNamara has refreshed his memory by listening to a tape recording of the meeting.
Usage notes: often used by lawyers when asking questions in a trial: “Will this photograph I now show you refresh your memory?”
See also: memory, refresh

down memory lane

in your memory of the pleasures of past events For older people, visiting the old-fashioned stores in the town was a trip down memory lane.
See also: down, lane, memory

commit something to memory

to make yourself remember something I haven't got a pen to write down your phone number - I'll just have to commit it to memory.
See also: commit, memory

jog your memory

to cause you to remember something Police are hoping to jog people's memory by showing them pictures of a car that was used in a robbery.
See also: jog, memory

in/within living memory

events or situations in living memory can be remembered by people who are alive now Areas of southern Italy are experiencing some of the worst storms in living memory. (= the worst storms that people can remember) Some of these houses still had outside toilets within living memory.
See also: living, memory

have a memory like an elephant

to be very good at remembering things
Usage notes: Elephants are believed to have good memories.
'I remember where I first saw her - it was at Tim Fisher's party about ten years ago.' 'Yes, you're right - you've got a memory like an elephant!'
See also: elephant, have, like, memory

take a stroll/trip down memory lane

to remember some of the happy things that you did in the past We were just taking a stroll down memory lane and recalling the days of our youth.
See commit to memory, jog memory, have a memory like a sieve
See also: down, lane, memory, stroll, take

have a memory/mind like a sieve

to be very bad at remembering things I've never known anyone so forgetful - she's got a memory like a sieve.
See also: have, like, memory, sieve

commit to memory

Learn by heart, memorize, as in The director insisted that the altos commit their part to memory by Tuesday. First recorded in 1875, this phrase today is often replaced by the shorter memorize.
See also: commit, memory

in memory of

As a reminder of or memorial to. For example, In memory of Grandma we put flowers on her grave every Easter, or In memory of our happy times here we've planted a little garden. [First half of 1300s]
See also: memory, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Language-dependent recall of autobiographical memories.
Thus phase-change memories have the clear potential to play an important role in future memory systems.
The conflict over lost and found memories of past traumas shows no sign of dissipating: Witness the final report of the American Psychological Association's working group on investigation of memories of childhood abuse, released in February.
In a handset, three areas require embedded memories.
Increasingly violent memories of repeated incest began to haunt her.
The High-Density (HD) memories address the needs of many applications that are optimized for area: the High-Speed (HS) memories address the requirements of high-performance systems and the Ultra-Low Power (ULP) memories address the needs of power-sensitive portable applications.
A new study, however, suggests that flashbulb memories give off a misleading sheen of precision.
The survey, conducted by Opinion Research Corporation and Creative Memories, also revealed what happens to America's photos when there is no time to preserve them.
Other researchers went on to probe the unconscious memories of amnesics with different implicit tasks.
The reports do not, however, dim an ongoing debate over the sturdiness of eyewitness memories.
enables us to reliably validate the characterization process for both third-party memory compilers and in-house customized memories.
Traces for different types of memories have been hypothesized to lie in specific brain regions far more limited than the expanse of activity picked up by John and his colleagues.
AUSTIN, Texas -- Achievement represents a crucial step in the delivery of next-generation non-volatile embedded memories