melons


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to melons: citrus, Oranges

melons

n. large breasts. (Usually objectionable.) Look at the melons on that babe!
See also: melon
References in classic literature ?
But melons are not very nutritious, and when we had satisfied our thirst with their pulpy substance, and put a stock to cool by the simple process of cutting them in two and setting them end on in the hot sun to grow cold by evaporation, we began to feel exceedingly hungry.
That night we went on again with the moon, carrying as many melons as we could with us.
Struggled on all day, but found no more melons, having evidently passed out of their district.
Wherefore," he concluded, "we shall slay you as soon as the melons are cultivated.
When I found a particularly promising variety of weed growing elsewhere than among my melons, I forthwith dug it up and transplanted it among my charges.
So long as the bungalow is empty, we are king and queen of the garden; and remember that as soon as our eggs in the melon bed hatch (as they may tomorrow), our children will need room and quiet.
In the melon bed, on the end nearest the wall, where the sun strikes nearly all day.
I shall order you destroyed in a few minutes, so you will have no need to ruin our pretty melon vines and berry bushes.
When he opened his eyes for the second time, he begged me to bring him a melon and some sugar, that he might eat and refresh himself.
I soon chose a fine melon out of those which remained, but could find no knife to cut it with.
They chop each melon so that the poor people cannot fish them out and eat anyway.
Well, it does beat all that I never thought about a dog not eating water- melon.
His head, in truth, felt precisely like a melon, and there was an un- pleasant sensation at his stomach.
He breakfasted with appetite and method, beginning with a slice of melon, and studying a morning paper while he waited for his toast and scrambled eggs.
There was the Gladstone and the small hand-bag, and the two hampers, and a large roll of rugs, and some four or five overcoats and macintoshes, and a few umbrellas, and then there was a melon by itself in a bag, because it was too bulky to go in anywhere, and a couple of pounds of grapes in another bag, and a Japanese paper umbrella, and a frying pan, which, being too long to pack, we had wrapped round with brown paper.