melons

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melons

n. large breasts. (Usually objectionable.) Look at the melons on that babe!
References in classic literature ?
In the melon bed, on the end nearest the wall, where the sun strikes nearly all day.
I soon chose a fine melon out of those which remained, but could find no knife to cut it with.
But melons are not very nutritious, and when we had satisfied our thirst with their pulpy substance, and put a stock to cool by the simple process of cutting them in two and setting them end on in the hot sun to grow cold by evaporation, we began to feel exceedingly hungry.
But I noticed some strawberries growing in one of the gardens, and some melons in another place.
They chop each melon so that the poor people cannot fish them out and eat anyway.
I split the melons with an old corn-knife, and we lifted out the hearts and ate them with the juice trickling through our fingers.
There's where it is, what I abominate, Senor Samson," said Sancho here; "my master will attack a hundred armed men as a greedy boy would half a dozen melons.
Horticulture seemed, however, to have been abandoned in the deserted kitchen-garden; and where cabbages, carrots, radishes, pease, and melons had once flourished, a scanty crop of lucerne alone bore evidence of its being deemed worthy of cultivation.
The fruit somewhat resembles in magnitude and general appearance one of our citron melons of ordinary size; but, unlike the citron, it has no sectional lines drawn along the outside.
In those days there was no corn or melons or pepper or sugar-cane, nor were there any little huts such as ye have all seen; and the Jungle People knew nothing of Man, but lived in the Jungle together, making one people.
The market people crowd the marketplace with their baskets of figs, dates, melons, apricots, etc.
and who, when taken close to the cheeses and told to sniff hard, said she could detect a faint odour of melons.
So a sensible man who has lost his chance of some beautiful inheritance might tread out the narrow bounds of his actual dwelling-place, and assure himself that life is supportable within its demesne, only one must grow turnips and cabbages, not melons and pomegranates.
They put me to work cultivating in a patch of melons.
And huge, golden melons of the papaia, ready for the eating, globuled directly from the slender- trunked trees not one-tenth the girth of the fruits they bore.