mean

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mean something

 (to someone)
1. Lit. to make sense to someone. Does this line mean anything to you? Yes, it means something.
2. Fig. [for someone] to cause positive feelings in another person. You mean a lot to me. This job means a lot to Ann.

mean

mod. having to do with someone or something that is very good; cool. This music is mean, man, mean. What a great sound!
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References in classic literature ?
Harris and I had been hard at work on our German during several weeks at that time, and although we had made good progress, it had been accomplished under great difficulty and annoyance, for three of our teachers had died in the mean time.
German names almost always do mean something, and this helps to deceive the student.
Centralisation of the means of communication and transport in the hands of the State.
Dramatic power, in general, means the presentation of life with the vivid active reality of life and character which especially distinguishes the acted drama.
You mean that the return of a deposit of gold which is to the injury of the receiver, if the two parties are friends, is not the repayment of a debt,--that is what you would imagine him to say?
I mean,' she said, 'that one can't help growing older.
I mean, that we are liable to be imposed upon, and to confer our choicest favours often on the undeserving, as you must own was your case in your bounty to that worthless fellow Partridge: for two or three such examples must greatly lessen the inward satisfaction which a good man would otherwise find in generosity; nay, may even make him timorous in bestowing, lest he should be guilty of supporting vice, and encouraging the wicked; a crime of a very black dye, and for which it will by no means be a sufficient excuse, that we have not actually intended such an encouragement; unless we have used the utmost caution in chusing the objects of our beneficence.
It means she's at last gettin' down somewheres near human--like folks; an' that she ain't jest doin' her duty by ye all the time.
This is by no means a new view; it is advocated, not only by the American authors I have mentioned, but by Mach in his Analysis of Sensations, which was published in 1886.
I simply mean to say that those rights that touch me.
With Venetian mystery I seek those No Thoroughfares at night, glide into them by means of dark courts, tempt the schoolmaster to follow, turn suddenly, and catch him before he can retreat.
But if you think I am hard on the boy I will try to give him a good word to-morrow -- that is, I mean if Beauty is better.
But what I mean," she went on, "isn't that I don't get woefully weary of the eternal French thing.
Many good matters, are undertaken with bad minds; I mean not only corrupt minds, but crafty minds, that intend not performance.
The third by receiving wages for work done, and this either by being employed in some mean art, or else in mere bodily labour.