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In telegraphic sentences, half swallowed at the ends, They hint a matter's inwardness--and there the matter ends.
Considering that the DAILY ANZEIGER issues the usual twenty-six numbers per month, the reading matter in a single number of the London TIMES would keep it in "copy" two months and a half.
As to secrecy; princes are not bound to communicate all matters, with all counsellors; but may extract and select.
It is in vain for princes, to take counsel concerning matters, if they take no counsel likewise concerning persons; for all matters are as dead images; and the life of the execution of affairs, resteth in the good choice of persons.
And are we assured, after looking at the matter from many points of view, that absolute being is or may be absolutely known, but that the utterly non-existent is utterly unknown?
Then opinion and knowledge have to do with different kinds of matter corresponding to this difference of faculties?
For so long as I am pleased with him, ma'am, nothing else greatly matters to Porthos.
All through the town, the lawyer was bowing right and left, and continually being button-holed by gentlemen on matters of burgh or private business; and I could see he was one greatly looked up to in the county.
Totski, who was living abroad at this time, very soon forgot all about the child; but five years after, returning to Russia, it struck him that he would like to look over his estate and see how matters were going there, and, arrived at his bailiff's house, he was not long in discovering that among the children of the latter there now dwelt a most lovely little girl of twelve, sweet and intelligent, and bright, and promising to develop beauty of most unusual quality-as to which last Totski was an undoubted authority.
It is not surprising, therefore, to find that from the first the Boeotian school is forced to season its matter with romantic episodes, and that later it tends more and more to revert (as in the "Shield of Heracles") to the Homeric tradition.
cries Western; "I thought it might have been some public matter, something about the nation.
But this position cannot be called materialistic, if, as seems to be the case, physics does not assume the existence of matter.
That particular matter, the matter of your censorship of a certain letter, has been the subject of a grave and earnest conference here between us all.
Others carry the matter still further, and inquire how many of his ancestors have been citizens, as his grandfather, great-grandfather, etc.
If I made the matter public, I have no evidence but moral evidence to bring forward.