marvel

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marvel at someone or something

Fig. to express wonder or surprise at someone or something. I can only marvel at Valerie and all she has accomplished. We all marveled at the beauty of the new building.
See also: marvel

marvel to behold

someone or something quite exciting or wonderful to see. Our new high-definition television is a marvel to behold. Mary's lovely new baby is a marvel to behold.
See also: behold, marvel

marvel at

v.
To be astonished or impressed by something: We walked through the carnival and marveled at all the rides and amusements.
See also: marvel
References in classic literature ?
and marvelling as she left him at the astonishing ignorance of a father.
No matter how often and fiercely Jerry rushed him, he met the rush with the stick, and chuckled aloud, understanding the puppy's courage, marvelling at the stupidity of life that impelled him continually to thrust his nose to the hurt of the stick, and that drove him, by passion of remembrance of a dead man to dare the pain of the stick again and again.
He had succeeded in making her talk her talk, and while she rattled on, he strove to follow her, marvelling at all the knowledge that was stowed away in that pretty head of hers, and drinking in the pale beauty of her face.
And so you're the chap," Messner said in marvelling accents.
To all this Mr Squeers listened, with greedy ears that devoured every syllable, and with his one eye and his mouth wide open: marvelling for what special reason he was honoured with so much of Ralph's confidence, and to what it all tended.
We may cease marvelling at the embryo of an air-breathing mammal or bird having branchial slits and arteries running in loops, like those in a fish which has to breathe the air dissolved in water, by the aid of well-developed branchiae.
One of the waiters, an Italian, had been struck down with a paralytic stroke that afternoon; and his Jewish employer, marvelling mildly at such superstitions, had consented to send for the nearest Popish priest.
Came days of fog, when even Maud's spirit drooped and there were no merry words upon her lips; days of calm, when we floated on the lonely immensity of sea, oppressed by its greatness and yet marvelling at the miracle of tiny life, for we still lived and struggled to live; days of sleet and wind and snow-squalls, when nothing could keep us warm; or days of drizzling rain, when we filled our water-breakers from the drip of the wet sail.