marry money

marry money

To marry someone solely or primarily to have access to their personal wealth. Given the extreme age difference between them, a lot of people speculated that she was simply marrying money. I think it's quite sad that people would rather marry money than find someone they truly love.
See also: marry, money

marry money

marry a rich person. informal
See also: marry, money

marry ˈmoney

marry a rich person: His sister married money — she lives in Bermuda now.
See also: marry, money
References in classic literature ?
Have resolved, I say, Pa, that to get money I must marry money.
I hate and detest being poor, and I won't be poor if I can marry money.
Over the years, Macdonald has heard many stories, aspirations and about philanthropic journeys that affected his understanding of the role of wealth in people's lives and "how to marry money and purpose.
The key fascination of "Belle" lies in its complex portrait of upper-class priorities coming into conflict--in this case, the historic segregation of blacks and whites, but also the deep-seated conviction that money should ideally marry money.
Scott also went on to marry money - in the form of Marie Patricia Stillman and they adopted a son and a daughter.
In the eternal battle of love versus money, all of Jane Austen's heroes and heroines were meant to marry money, and so, in the Regency House Party game, each of the young men and women were given an annual income.
Ivon, whose ambition is to leave her job and marry money, starts to take an interest in Carlos.