marry


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marry the gunner's daughter

obsolete naval Of a seaman, to be bound to a cannon or other such armament and flogged or lashed as corporal punishment. The first mate ended up marrying the gunner's daughter for attempting to bring about a mutiny on the ship.
See also: daughter, marry

marry beneath (oneself)

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry beneath himself like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying beneath herself with some fast food worker.
See also: beneath, marry

marry above (one's) station

To marry someone who is of a higher social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that the local fishmonger's daughter is betrothed to a rich foreign lawyer!" B: "My word, she's certainly marrying above her station, isn't she?" For all the talk that social classes have been wiped away in recent years, you will still find people who believe one can't or shouldn't marry above one's station.
See also: above, marry, station

marry into money

To become wealthy or financially secure by marrying someone who is wealthy or has a wealthy family. Ever since he married into money, George has been flaunting all of the exotic vacations he and his new wife take. During college, when I had barely enough money to eat each day, I vowed that someday I'd marry into money and start living a much more comfortable life.
See also: marry, money

marry (someone) for (his or her) money

To marry someone solely or primarily to have access to their personal wealth. Given the extreme age difference between them, a lot of people speculated that she was simply marrying Donald for his money. I think it's quite sad that people would marry for money rather than true love of their spouse.
See also: marry, money

never marry for money, but marry where money is

Wealth should not be one's primary focus in choosing a spouse, but it is an important consideration. A: "My fiancée is not exactly rich, but she does have a well-paying job." B: "That's good. Never marry for money, but marry where money is."
See also: but, marry, money, never

be (not) the marrying kind

To be a person who is interested in getting married. This phrase is often used in the negative to convey a disinterest in or opposition to marriage. Considering how many the women he's dated in the past year alone, Jack is not the marrying kind! Oh, you're the marrying kind—you just haven't met the right person yet.
See also: kind, marry

marry above (oneself)

To marry someone who is of a higher social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that the local fishmonger's daughter is betrothed to a rich foreign lawyer!" B: "My word, she's certainly marrying above herself, isn't she?" For all the talk that social classes have been wiped away in recent years, you will still find people who believe one can't or shouldn't marry above oneself.
See also: above, marry

marry below (one's) station

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry below his station like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying below her station with some fast food worker.
See also: below, marry, station

marry below (oneself)

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry below himself like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying below herself with some fast food worker.
See also: below, marry

marry beneath (one's) station

To marry someone who is of a lower social class or standing than oneself. A: "I hear that Mr. Sullivan plans to marry a local fishmonger's daughter." B: "Why would a man of his esteem marry beneath his station like that?" Janet has a bright future with one of the best law firms in town, so it's beyond me why she's marrying beneath her station with some fast food worker.
See also: beneath, marry, station

marry in haste, repent at leisure

If you marry someone without being certain that you should, you will regret it for a long time. She's only known him for three months! You know what they say—marry in haste, repent at leisure.
See also: leisure, marry

marry money

To marry someone solely or primarily to have access to their personal wealth. Given the extreme age difference between them, a lot of people speculated that she was simply marrying money. I think it's quite sad that people would rather marry money than find someone they truly love.
See also: marry, money

marry above oneself

Fig. to marry someone in a higher social class than oneself. They say she married above herself, but who cares? Scott thought it would not be possible to marry above himself.
See also: above, marry

marry below oneself

 and marry beneath oneself
Fig. to marry someone in a lower social class than oneself. He married beneath himself, but he is happy, and what more is required of a marriage? He did not want to marry beneath himself.
See also: below, marry

Marry in haste, (and) repent at leisure.

Prov. If you marry someone you do not know well, or decide to marry someone without first carefully considering what you are doing, you will probably regret it for a long time. Sally wanted some time to consider Sam's proposal of marriage; she had heard the saying, "Marry in haste, and repent at leisure."
See also: leisure, marry

marry into something

to become a part of a family or a fortune by marriage. She married into money, they say. I always wanted to marry into a large family until I found out what that means in terms of buying gifts.
See also: marry

marry one's way out of something

to get out of something, such as poverty, by marrying someone. She was able to marry her way out of poverty but regretted it in the long run. Sally married her way out of one unhappy home into another one.
See also: marry, of, out, way

marry someone off (to someone)

to manage to get someone married to someone and out of the house or family. Her parents wanted nothing more than to marry her off to a doctor. They married off their children soon.
See also: marry, off

marry up (with someone)

Rur. to marry someone. They married up in the spring. Jane's going to marry up with someone she met at school.
See also: marry, up

marry money

marry a rich person. informal
See also: marry, money

marry in ˈhaste (, repent at ˈleisure)

(saying) people who marry quickly, without really getting to know each other, will discover later that they have made a mistake
See also: haste, marry

marry ˈmoney

marry a rich person: His sister married money — she lives in Bermuda now.
See also: marry, money
References in periodicals archive ?
9] Yet their choice was not between marrying or not marrying but whether to marry a particular man.
In fact, many seventeenth-century couples in the parishes of Ourense stated that prior to the wedding ceremony inscribed in the marriage register, they already had given each other "hand and word in marriage" or that at an earlier point they had promised not to marry anyone else, thereby contracting legitimate marriages by local standards and even by the varied doctrines of the medieval Church, but not according to the Catholic Reformation Church.
Many couples, though not forbidden to marry because of an impediment such as a marriage bond with a third party, have obstacles which priests find difficult to overcome.
10) In the Spanish original we have already come across one of the major unexplained cultural assumptions--the question to which the answer is "yes" is the unwritten but traditionally implicit question "will you marry me?
Steve Hansen with the lobbying group Equality California, said the ability of same-sex couples to marry is the ultimate goal.
Clarke, who lives in Provincetown with his partner of 17 years, Peter Karl (the two plan to marry "when the dust settles").
First, they say that the Catholic who leaves the ministry in order to marry is in a significantly different situation than the married priest convert.
The surprised disciples said to him, `If that is how things are between husband and wife, it is not advisable to marry.
He threw the issue back to the legislature, saying it must either allow same-sex couples to marry or create a Vermont-style civil union alternative.
If Sondra Locke married Elliot Ness, then divorced him to marry Herman Munster, she'd become Sondra Locke Ness Munster.
In the Eastern Churches candidates for the priesthood may marry before ordination, but not after.
Popert adds, "I'm completely unconvinced that once we've won the right to marry, that means our struggle for freedom is over.
As for the prizes awarded to couples who didn't marry, Freeman said the station will examine its options.
More properly defined, this ground means not only that someone made a mistake, but also that a person was for some reason incapable of making a good decision--incapable of evaluating a situation, making a proper judgment, and acting accordingly in deciding to marry.
Give complete freedom to national episcopal conferences to determine pastoral needs and discipline, including perhaps the ordination of single men who might want to marry later.