marche

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get (one's) marching orders

To be dismissed from employment or to be ordered to leave or move on from a place. An allusion to a military command of deployment. After messing up that account, I'm terrified that I'm going to get my marching orders. Bill had been living in his parents' house for nearly a year without working when he finally got his marching orders out of there.
See also: get, marche, order

march to (the beat of) a different drum

To do something, act, or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to the beat of a different drum. Look, I respect the fact that you like to march to a different drum, but do you have to make a point of doing everything in a counter-cultural way?
See also: beat, different, drum, march

march to (the beat of) (one's) own drum

To do something, act, or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to the beat of his own drum. Look, I respect the fact that you like to march to your own drum, but do you have to make a point of doing everything in a counter-cultural way?
See also: beat, drum, march, own

march to (one's) own beat

To do something, act, or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to his own beat. Look, I respect the fact that you like to march to your own beat, but do you have to make a point of doing everything in a counter-cultural way?
See also: beat, march, own

(one's) marching orders

1. A command or direction to advance, progress, or move on. (Usually used with "get" or "give.") We were waiting for the project leader to give us our marching orders before we began development of the next iteration of the software. Bill had been living in his parents' house for nearly a year without working when he finally got his marching orders to move out.
2. A notice of dismissal from one's employment. After messing up that account, I'm terrified that I'm going to get my marching orders any day now. The boss gave Daniel his marching orders for arriving to work drunk.
See also: marche, order

(one's) marching papers

1. A command or direction to advance, progress, or move on. (Usually used with "get" or "give.") (Note: A nonstandard combination of the synonyms "marching orders" and "walking papers.") We were waiting for the project leader to give us our marching papers before we began development of the next iteration of the software. Bill had been living in his parents' house for nearly a year without working when he finally got his marching papers to move out.
2. A notice of dismissal from one's employment. After messing up that account, I'm terrified that I'm going to get my marching papers any day now. The boss gave Daniel his marching papers for arriving to work drunk.
See also: marche, paper

march to (the beat of) a different drummer

To do something or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to the beat of a different drummer.

give (one) (one's) marching orders

To dismiss one from employment; to order one to leave or move on from a place. An allusion to a military command of deployment. After messing up that account, I'm terrified that my boss is going to give me my marching orders. Bill had been living in his parents' house for nearly a year without working when they finally gave him his marching orders out of there.
See also: give, marche, order

march to a different beat

To do something, act, or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to a different beat. Look, I respect the fact that you like to march to a different beat, but do you have to make a point of doing everything in a contrarian way?
See also: beat, different, march

march to (the beat of) a different tune

To do something or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to the beat of a different tune.
See also: beat, different, march, tune

quick march

1. noun A very quick or brisk walk. But it was no quick march for the celebrity, who made a point of shaking the hands of as many fans as he could.
2. verb To walk very quickly or briskly. A reference to military marching, the phrase is often issued as a command. Police are pursuing a suspect who was seen quick marching away from the scene of the crime. Come on, now, quick march! It's starting to rain.
See also: march, quick

march on

1. To continue walking or marching forward. We had no choice but to march on, despite the rain.
2. To continue doing something or making progress. We've run into a few problems with the software, but we're still marching on to meet our December deadline.
3. To move forward unabated or unhindered. Each day marches on, and before we know it, we're in our 50s with all the promise of our youth behind us.
See also: march, on

in marching order

organized and equipped; ready to go. (Originally military.) Is our luggage all packed and in marching order? We're in marching order and eager to go, sir.
See also: marche, order

march on

 
1. Lit. to continue marching. Please march on. Don't stop here; there are other parts of the parade coming along behind you. Let's march on. We have a long way to go.
2. Fig. [for time] to continue. Time marches on. We are all getting older. As the day marches on, try to get everything completed.
See also: march, on

marching orders, get one's

Be ordered to move on or proceed; also, be dismissed from a job. For example, The sales force got their marching orders yesterday, so now they'll be on the road with the new product , or It's too bad about Jack-the boss gave him his marching orders Friday. This expression originally alluded to a military command. [Colloquial; late 1700s]
See also: get, marche

march to a different beat

Also, march to a different drummer. Act independently, differ in conduct or ideas from most others, as in Joe wanted to be married on a mountain top-he always marches to a different beat, or Sarah has her own ideas for the campaign; she marches to a different drummer. This idiom, alluding to being out of step in a parade, is a version of Henry David Thoreau's statement in Walden (1854): "If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer." It came into wide use in the mid-1900s.
See also: beat, different, march

give someone their marching orders

BRITISH
COMMON If you give someone their marching orders, you tell them to leave. Last week the political correspondent was given his marching orders. What does it take for a woman to say `that's enough' and give her man his marching orders? He was given his marching orders after attacking the opposition goalkeeper twice. He has now been banned from playing for two weeks. Note: You can also say that someone gets their marching orders. Her teacher told the head: `Either she goes or I go.' So Mary got her marching orders. Note: The usual American expression is give someone their walking papers.
See also: give, marche, order, someone

marching orders

AMERICAN
Your marching orders are the instructions that you are given in order to carry out a plan or achieve an aim. As one White House official put it, `We're still waiting for our marching orders.' Program executives have new marching orders for Hollywood producers. Note: The above expressions relate to the army. When soldiers are given marching orders, they are ordered to march to a particular place.
See also: marche, order

marching orders

a dismissal or sending off.
In military terminology, marching orders are literally instructions from a superior officer for troops to depart. The North American version of the idiom is marching papers .
See also: marche, order

get your ˈmarching orders

(British English, informal) be ordered to leave a place, a job, etc: When he kept arriving late he got his marching orders.These were originally the orders given for soldiers to depart.
See also: get, marche, order

give somebody their ˈmarching orders

(British English, informal) tell somebody to leave a job, a relationship, etc: When she found out he was seeing another woman, she gave him his marching orders.
See also: give, marche, order, somebody

ˌquick ˈmarch

used for telling somebody to walk faster: Come on! Quick march or we’ll miss the bus.
‘Quick march’ is also a command given to soldiers.
See also: march, quick

march on

v.
1. To continue to march: The militia marched on despite the jeers from the people on the sidewalk.
2. To assemble and walk to some place in order to express an opinion, especially opposition, to people of power there: The employees' union marched on the state capitol.
See also: march, on
References in periodicals archive ?
The Montreal Catholic Times reports as follows: "Under a large pink banner, proclaiming 'Blessed are those who fight for justice,' Christian Women marched together.
Catholic schools and teachers and the Canadian Religious Conference marched under their own banners.
Carrying flags, signs and a banner reading ``March for Jesus,'' more than 1,000 Christians marched in Lancaster on Saturday morning as part of a worldwide effort to break down denominational walls.
The participants of all ages gathered at Lancaster City Park, then marched five blocks along Avenue K-8 and made a loop back to the park where there were music and speakers.
Last year more than 1 million people participated in the march in 625 cities throughout the United States including more than 2,500 who marched in the Antelope Valley.
1979: Spurred by the success of Anita Bryant's antigay Save Our Children campaign, more than 100,000 gays and lesbians marched on Washington in the first-ever national gay political gathering.
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