marche

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Related to marched: plodded, marched to the beat of his own drum

get (one's) marching orders

To be dismissed from employment or to be ordered to leave or move on from a place. An allusion to a military command of deployment. After messing up that account, I'm terrified that I'm going to get my marching orders. Bill had been living in his parents' house for nearly a year without working when he finally got his marching orders out of there.
See also: get, marche, order

march to (the beat of) a different drum

To do something, act, or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to the beat of a different drum. Look, I respect the fact that you like to march to a different drum, but do you have to make a point of doing everything in a counter-cultural way?
See also: beat, different, drum, march

march to (the beat of) (one's) own drum

To do something, act, or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to the beat of his own drum. Look, I respect the fact that you like to march to your own drum, but do you have to make a point of doing everything in a counter-cultural way?
See also: beat, drum, march

march to (one's) own beat

To do something, act, or behave in a manner that does not conform to the standard, prevalent, or popular societal norm. My brother's eschewed the idea of a full-time career and has had every oddball job you could think of, but then he's always been happy marching to his own beat. Look, I respect the fact that you like to march to your own beat, but do you have to make a point of doing everything in a counter-cultural way?
See also: beat, march

(one's) marching orders

1. A command or direction to advance, progress, or move on. (Usually used with "get" or "give.") We were waiting for the project leader to give us our marching orders before we began development of the next iteration of the software. Bill had been living in his parents' house for nearly a year without working when he finally got his marching orders to move out.
2. A notice of dismissal from one's employment. After messing up that account, I'm terrified that I'm going to get my marching orders any day now. The boss gave Daniel his marching orders for arriving to work drunk.
See also: marche, order

(one's) marching papers

1. A command or direction to advance, progress, or move on. (Usually used with "get" or "give.") (Note: A nonstandard combination of the synonyms "marching orders" and "walking papers.") We were waiting for the project leader to give us our marching papers before we began development of the next iteration of the software. Bill had been living in his parents' house for nearly a year without working when he finally got his marching papers to move out.
2. A notice of dismissal from one's employment. After messing up that account, I'm terrified that I'm going to get my marching papers any day now. The boss gave Daniel his marching papers for arriving to work drunk.
See also: marche, paper

in marching order

organized and equipped; ready to go. (Originally military.) Is our luggage all packed and in marching order? We're in marching order and eager to go, sir.
See also: marche, order

give somebody their marching orders

to tell someone to leave Debbie's finally given her husband his marching orders after ten years of an unhappy marriage.
See also: give, marche, order

marching orders, get one's

Be ordered to move on or proceed; also, be dismissed from a job. For example, The sales force got their marching orders yesterday, so now they'll be on the road with the new product , or It's too bad about Jack-the boss gave him his marching orders Friday. This expression originally alluded to a military command. [Colloquial; late 1700s]
See also: get, marche
References in classic literature ?
The Chief of the Whimsies now marched his false-headed forces into the tunnel.
After all his dangerous allies had marched into the tunnel the Nome King and General Guph started to follow them, at the head of fifty thousand Nomes, all fully armed.
On, on, on the vast ranks of invaders marched, filling the tunnel from side to side.
For many days they marched, the apes following the trail easily and going a little distance ahead of the body of the caravan that they might warn the others of impending danger.
By which the reader may perceive (a circumstance which we have not thought necessary to communicate before) that this was the very time when the late rebellion was at the highest; and indeed the banditti were now marched into England, intending, as it was thought, to fight the king's forces, and to attempt pushing forward to the metropolis.
All that day the serjeant and the young soldier marched together; and the former, who was an arch fellow, told the latter many entertaining stories of his campaigns, though in reality he had never made any; for he was but lately come into the service, and had, by his own dexterity, so well ingratiated himself with his officers, that he had promoted himself to a halberd; chiefly indeed by his merit in recruiting, in which he was most excellently well skilled.
No man in the British army which has marched away, not the great Duke himself, could be more cool or collected in the presence of doubts and difficulties, than the indomitable little aide-de-camp's wife.
If Captain Dobbin expected to get any personal comfort and satisfaction from having one more view of Amelia before the regiment marched away, his selfishness was punished just as such odious egotism deserved to be.
The sun was just rising as the march began--it was a gallant sight-- the band led the column, playing the regimental march--then came the Major in command, riding upon Pyramus, his stout charger--then marched the grenadiers, their Captain at their head; in the centre were the colours, borne by the senior and junior Ensigns--then George came marching at the head of his company.
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