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all over the map

1. Spread out or scattered over a great distance. I love how people from all over the map make their way to this bar for a drink.
2. In or having a great number and variety. Public opinion is all over the map for the governor, so it's hard to know how she'll do in the next election.
3. Unorganized or scattered in thinking, communication, or planning. I tried to get a sense of John's plan for the project, but he seems all over the map with it.
See also: all, map, over

the map is not the territory

A person or thing is completely separate from the judgments or perceptions that people place upon it. The phrase was coined by US semanticist Alfred Korzybski. I know you dislike Ed because of how he acted in that meeting, but you don't actually know him. Just keep in mind that the map is not the territory, OK?
See also: map, not, territory

blow off the map

To obliterate. A noun can be used between "blow" and "off." Many buildings were blown off the map during the siege. The dictator threatened to blow our country off the map.
See also: blow, map, off

fall off the map

To become unpopular or little-known. Wow, I didn't realize that this show was still on TV—it really fell off the map after its first season.
See also: fall, map, off

put (something or some place) on the map

To make some place or thing very famous or renowned; to establish some place as being remarkable or noteworthy. It was my grandma's chili recipe that put this restaurant on the map years ago! They're hoping that this amusement park can put the small town on the map.
See also: map, on, put

map something out

to plot something out carefully, usually on paper. I have a good plan. I will map it out for you. I will map out the plan for you.
See also: map, out

put something on the map

Fig. to make some place famous or popular. The good food you serve here will really put this place on the map. Nothing like a little scandal to put an otherwise sleepy town on the map.
See also: map, on, put

put on the map

Make famous, publicize, as in The incident got on the national news and put our community on the map. This expression, alluding to a locality that formerly was too small to put on a map, dates from the early 1900s.
See also: map, on, put

wipe off the map

Also, wipe off the face of the earth. Eliminate completely, as in Some day we hope to wipe malaria off the map. This idiom uses wipe in the sense of "obliterate," and map and face of the earth in the sense of "everywhere."
See also: map, off, wipe

put someone/something on the map

COMMON If someone or something puts a person, place, or thing on the map, they cause them to become well-known or important. The film which really put Ellen Barkin on the map was The Big Easy. In today's programme, we look at the career of the man who, in 13 years as Chancellor, put Austria back on the map.
See also: map, on, put, something

off the map

(of a place) very distant or remote. Compare with off the beaten track (at beaten).
See also: map, off

put something on the map

make something prominent or important.
See also: map, on, put, something

wipe something off the map

obliterate something totally.
See also: map, off, something, wipe

(be) off the ˈmap

(be) far away from other places; (be) remote: It’s a little house in the country, a bit off the map.
See also: map, off

put somebody/something on the ˈmap

make somebody/something famous or important: Her performance in her first film really put her on the map.The newspaper story put the village on the map.
See also: map, on, put, somebody, something

map out

v.
1. To plan something explicitly: Let's map out a way to accomplish this project. We mapped the trip out so we wouldn't get lost.
2. To incorporate or lay out some set of things into an explicit map, plan, or order: I've mapped out the beginning and end of each project on this timeline. The houses on these city blocks have been mapped out for demolition.
See also: map, out

map

1. n. one’s face. With a map like that, she could really go somewhere.
2. n. sheet music. (see also chart.) I left the map at home. Can I look at yours?

throw a map

tv. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. Somebody threw a map on the sidewalk.
See also: map, throw

all over the map

1. In, from, or to a variety of places; ubiquitously.
2. Showing great variety; varied or diverse: "Literary nonfiction is all over the map and has been for three hundred years" (William Zinsser).
See also: all, map, over

put on the map

To make well-known, prominent, or famous.
See also: map, on, put

wipe off the map

To destroy completely; annihilate.
See also: map, off, wipe
References in classic literature ?
He stood with a map on Mercator's projection before him, swaying to the swinging of the ship and talking of guns and tonnage, of ships and their build and powers and speed, of strategic points, and bases of operation.
Bert stood by, saying very little, but watching Kurt's finger on the map.
We had landed, and I now stood upon the spot where, according to my map, a large city should rear its spires and chimneys.
When I had finished reading the above, and shown the copy of the map, drawn by the dying hand of the old Dom with his blood for ink, there followed a silence of astonishment.
You shall see the original map and writing when we reach Durban," I answered, somewhat mollified, for really when I came to consider the question it was scarcely wonderful that he should doubt my good faith.
The map may be all right enough," said one of the party, "if you know whereabouts in it we are now.
They did know where they were, and the map was once more consulted, and the thing seemed simpler than ever, and off they started for the third time.
I will do so," said Prince Andrew, moving away from the map.
Walter Map, like so many of the writers of this early time, was a priest.
And this is the story which the poet-priest, Walter Map, used to give new life and new glory to the tales of Arthur.
Now in this map we see that the reefs tinted pale and dark-blue, which have been produced by the same order of movement, as a general rule manifestly stand near each other.
And even when she penetrated to the inner depths, she found only the ordinary table and Turkey carpet, and though the map over the fireplace did depict a helping of West Africa, it was a very ordinary map.
All I do is to put it on a star, revolve the scale till it is opposite those figures on the map underneath, and presto
I found him (for example) in the library, sitting under the map of Modern Italy, and quite unaware of any other method of meeting his troubles, except the method of talking about them.
The room, quite a large one, but with a low ceiling, was scantily furnished, and an electric bulb with a porcelain shade pulled low down over a big table (with a very large map spread on it) left its distant parts in a dim, artificial twilight.