manner

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Related to manners: Table manners

company manners

Exceptional manners; those that are preferred or required in and among polite society. One must at all times exhibit company manners if one is to make a good impression among the more influential members of society.
See also: company, manner

mind (one's) manners

To be well behaved and act appropriately. Make sure you mind your manners while you are with your Aunt Josephine. I don't want to hear about you giving her any trouble while I'm away!
See also: manner, mind

manners maketh man

A good man has a strong sense of morality. This phrase is typically attributed to 14th-century bishop William of Wykeham. To hear that so many of our students intervened to stop this crime restores my faith in the youth of the world. Manners maketh man, you know.
See also: maketh, man, manner

all kinds of

1. Many varieties or types of. You meet all kinds of people when you live in a big city. It's a huge store with all kinds of dresses—I'm sure you'll find one you like.
2. slang Extremely; very. Oh, their family is all kinds of dysfunctional! That movie was all kinds of awesome! I can't wait to see it again.
See also: all, kind, of

all manner of

Many varieties or types of. You meet all manner of people when you live in a big city. It's a huge store with all manner of dresses—I'm sure you'll find one you like.
See also: all, manner, of

by all means

1. Certainly; absolutely. By all means, come to our party if you end up being free on Saturday night!
2. In any way possible, regardless of risk or expense. There will be a lot of people at this event, but we need to court that one big investor by all means.
See also: all, mean

devil-may-care attitude

A nonchalant attitude, especially toward risks or consequences. I can't believe he went out on his motorcycle in this rain. His devil-may-care attitude is going to get him killed. If you keep up this devil-may-care attitude toward your money, you'll be broke in no time.
See also: attitude

in a manner of speaking

In a way; in a sense; so to speak. He was a fixer, in a manner of speaking. A man who could get things done.
See also: manner, of, speaking

to the manner born

Coming naturally, as if accustomed from birth. She grew up in the ghetto, but once she became famous she's taken to rubbing shoulders with the upper crust as if to the manner born.
See also: born, manner

bedside manner

One's demeanor and behavior when interacting with patients, as of a medical professional, especially a doctor. Based on his bedside manner, I wonder if Dr. Smith is capable of feeling compassion at all.
See also: manner

in the manner of (someone or something)

In the style or method typical of or usually associated with someone or something. He told us the news in the manner of someone who had just lost a loved on. Why wasn't he more excited? The tech company has started releasing incremental hardware updates, much in the manner of their largest competitor in the market.
See also: manner, of

after the fashion of someone or something

 and after the style of someone or something
in the manner or style of someone or something. She walks down the street after the fashion of a grand lady. The parish church was built after the style of a French cathedral.
See also: after, fashion, of

*all kinds of someone or something

Fig. a great number of people or things; a great amount of something, especially money. (*Typically: be ~; have ~.) There were all kinds of people there, probably thousands. The Smith family has all kinds of money.
See also: all, kind, of

all manner of someone or something

Fig. all types of people or things. We saw all manner of people there. They came from every country in the world. They were selling all manner of things in the country store.
See also: all, manner, of

by all means

certainly; yes; absolutely. I will attempt to get there by all means. Bob: Can you come to dinner tomorrow? Jane: By all means. I'd love to.
See also: all, mean

comport oneself with some manner

to behave in a certain manner. I hope you are able to comport yourself with better behavior next time. The old man was able to comport himself with dignity.
See also: comport, manner

devil-may-care attitude

 and devil-may-care manner
a very casual attitude; a worry-free or carefree attitude. You must get rid of your devil-may-care attitude if you want to succeed. She acts so thoughtless—with her devil-may-care manner.
See also: attitude

equate

someone to someone else and equate something to something else to claim that someone is in some manner the same as someone else; to claim that something is in some manner the same as something else. I would equate Tom to Wallywhen it comes to native ability. You cannot equate my car to that jalopy you drive!

forget one's manners

to do something ill-mannered. Jimmy! Have we forgotten our manners?
See also: forget, manner

other times, other manners.

Prov. Different generations or eras have different customs. Amy thought her grandchildren addressed their friends in startlingly rude terms. "But then," she reflected, "other times, other manners." Jane: The young folks today are so shocking. Why, when I was their age, you wouldn't kiss your husband in public, let alone some of the things these children do! Alan: Other times, other manners.
See also: manner, other

all kinds of

1. Also, all manner or sorts of . All or many varieties of something, as in Before the banquet, they served all kinds of drinks, or He sold exotic fruit of all sorts, or The museum featured all manner of artifacts. [Early 1300s]
2. A large amount of something, as in She has all kinds of money. This hyperbolic usage is colloquial.
See also: all, kind, of

by all means

1. Also, by all manner of means. In every possible way, as in I plan to make use of him by all means. [Late 1400s]
2. Also, by all manner of means. Without fail, at any cost, as in Losing the contract is to be avoided by all means. [c. 1600]
3. Certainly, yes, as in Are you coming tonight?-By all means, I'll be there. [Late 1600s] Also see by any means; by no means.
See also: all, mean

company manners

One's best behavior, as in George never interrupts when we have guests; he has fine company manners. This term employs company in the sense of "guests." An older variant, Tell me thy company and I'll tell thee thy manners, uses company in the sense of "companions." The current term implies that one is more mindful of politeness with invited guests.
See also: company, manner

in a manner of speaking

In a way; so to speak. For example, He was, in a manner of speaking, asked to leave the group. [Late 1800s]
See also: manner, of, speaking

to the manner born

Accustomed from birth to a particular behavior or lifestyle, as in At a high-society function she behaves as though to the manner born, but we know she came from very humble circumstances . This term was invented by Shakespeare in Hamlet. Referring to the King's carousing in Danish style, Hamlet says (1:4): "Though I am native here And to the manner born, it is a custom More honor'd in the breach than the observance." The manner in this expression was later sometimes changed to manor, "the main house of an estate," and the idiom's sense became equated with "high-born" (and therefore accustomed to luxury), a way in which it is often used today.
See also: born, manner

bedside manner

a doctor's approach or attitude to a patient.
1993 Bill Moyers Healing & the Mind Are you just talking about the old-fashioned bedside manner of a doctor who comes around and visits you when you need him?
See also: manner

in a manner of speaking

in some sense; so to speak.
Manner of speaking is recorded from the mid 16th century; compare with French façon de parler , which has been in use in English since the early 19th century.
See also: manner, of, speaking

to the manner born

naturally at ease in a specified way of life, job, or situation.
This comes from Shakespeare's Hamlet: ‘though I am native here And to the manner born’. Punning on this expression, to the manor born is used to refer to someone who has aristocratic origins.
See also: born, manner

all ˈmanner of somebody/something

many different types of people or things: The problem can be solved in all manner of ways.

in the manner of somebody/something

(formal) in a style that is typical of somebody/something: a painting in the manner of Raphael

in a ˌmanner of ˈspeaking

if you think about it in a certain way: ‘Are they married?’ ‘In a manner of speaking — they’ve lived together for 15 years.’
See also: manner, of, speaking

(as if) to the ˌmanner ˈborn

(formal) as if a job, a social position, etc. were completely natural to you: He rides round in a Rolls Royce as if to the manner born.
See also: born, manner

by ˈall means

(spoken) used to say that you are very willing for somebody to have something or do something: ‘Can I smoke?’ ‘By all means.’‘Do you think I could borrow this dictionary?’ ‘Yes, by all means.’
See also: all, mean

all kinds of

Informal
Plenty of; ample: We have all kinds of time to finish the job.
See also: all, kind, of

in a manner of speaking

In a way; so to speak.
See also: manner, of, speaking

to the manner born

Accustomed to a position, custom, or lifestyle from or as if from birth.
See also: born, manner

by all means

Without fail; certainly.
See also: all, mean

manner born

Familiar with such things. The phrase comes from Hamlet: “But to my mind, though I am native here. And to the manner born, it is a custom / More honour'd in the breach than the observance.” The widespread confusion between “manner and “manor” has been going on for at least two centuries. “To the manor born,” in the sense of accustomed to luxury as if raised in an aristocratic environment, was used as the title of a British sitcom that achieved some popularity on American public television.
See also: born, manner
References in classic literature ?
On the other hand, I have already said, that if any thing like a true picture of old English manners could be drawn, I would trust to the good-nature and good sense of my countrymen for insuring its favourable reception.
The tales, therefore, though less purely Oriental than in their first concoction, were eminently better fitted for the European market, and obtained an unrivalled degree of public favour, which they certainly would never have gained had not the manners and style been in some degree familiarized to the feelings and habits of the western reader.
In point of justice, therefore, to the multitudes who will, I trust, devour this book with avidity, I have so far explained our ancient manners in modern language, and so far detailed the characters and sentiments of my persons, that the modern reader will not find himself, I should hope, much trammelled by the repulsive dryness of mere antiquity.
acted upon another principle; and in distinguishing between what was ancient and modern, forgot, as it appears to me, that extensive neutral ground, the large proportion, that is, of manners and sentiments which are common to us and to our ancestors, having been handed down unaltered from them to us, or which, arising out of the principles of our common nature, must have existed alike in either state of society.
When they had paraded the street and all the avenues of the building in this manner for near two hours, they turned away, and his friend asked him what he thought of what he had seen, and whether he was prepared for a good hot piece of work if it should come to that.
You could not have met with a person more capable of giving you certain information on that head than myself, for I have been connected with his family in a particular manner from my infancy.
You may well be surprised, Miss Bennet, at such an assertion, after seeing, as you probably might, the very cold manner of our meeting yesterday.
Elizabeth was again deep in thought, and after a time exclaimed, "to treat in such a manner the godson, the friend, the favorite of his father
You forget it is in order to remember me," said Julia, in a manner that spoke her own ideas of the value of the gift.
But let us examine this question after the manner of the courts--"
Certainly one so learned in the subject need not dread a cross-examination," cried the youth, in her own manner.
Society loves creole natures, and sleepy languishing manners, so that they cover sense, grace and good-will: the air of drowsy strength, which disarms criticism; perhaps because such a person seems to reserve himself for the best of the game, and not spend himself on surfaces; an ignoring eye, which does not see the annoyances, shifts, and inconveniences that cloud the brow and smother the voice of the sensitive.
Yet so long as it is the highest circle in the imagination of the best heads on the planet, there is something necessary and excellent in it; for it is not to be supposed that men have agreed to be the dupes of anything preposterous; and the respect which these mysteries inspire in the most rude and sylvan characters, and the curiosity with which details of high life are read, betray the universality of the love of cultivated manners.
A man is but a little thing in the midst of the objects of nature, yet, by the moral quality radiating from his countenance he may abolish all considerations of magnitude, and in his manners equal the majesty of the world.
Compare their manner of carrying themselves; of walking; of speaking; of being silent.