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get in

1. To access or enter some place. No, I forgot my key, so I can't get in.
2. To reach some destination. What time does your plane get in? It's a long drive, so we won't get in until after midnight.
3. To be admitted into something, often an academic institution. She applied to some really good schools, but with her grades, I'm afraid she won't get in.
4. To use one's position or influence to cause someone to gain admittance to some organization or place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "in." I heard you were a member of that club. Do you think you could get me in? I'm on the list for tonight's show, so I can probably get you in, too.
5. To manage to do something within a specific time frame. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "in." I just need to get in another five minutes of sleep before the alarm goes off again.
6. To reach a particular state or condition. I'm trying to get in shape for the wedding, but I hate going to the gym.
7. To join or become a part of something. We need to get in on Joe's latest money-making scheme! Don't worry about getting in with the popular kids at school—just focus on your studies.
See also: get

get someone in(to) something

 
1. Lit. to manage to put someone into a confining area or into clothing. I couldn't get Billy into his boots!
2. Fig. to manage to get someone enrolled into a school, club, organization, class, etc.; to manage to get someone accepted into something. Somehow, we managed to get Jody into a fine private school. We got her in the group at last! Well, I managed to get myself into the class I wanted.
See also: get

get someone or something in(to) something

 and get someone or something in
to manage to fit someone or something into something. I will try to get you into the beginning of the line. The key is bent, but I think I can get it in. He struggled to get in the key.
See also: get

get something in(to) someone

to make something enter someone or something. Get that morphine into her before she goes into shock. Let's get some food into him. He looks starved.
See also: get

get something in(to) something

to manage to put something into something. I got the notice into tomorrow's newspaper. I will get the replacement battery into the car right away.
See also: get

manage with someone or something

to do as well as possible with only someone or something (less than one had hoped for). We wanted Kelly to help us, but we will manage with Larry. I am sure we can manage with the money that we have.
See also: manage

manage without someone or something

to do as well as possible without someone or something. Carla said that she just can't manage without Jerry. We just can't manage without some more money.
See also: manage, without

get in

1. Enter a place, as in We managed to get in just before the doors closed. [First half of 1500s]
2. Arrive, as in We got in late last night. [Early 1600s]
3. Be elected to office or become accepted, as in a club. For example, Marge asked the club if she could get in. The variant get into takes an object, as in Things changed after he got into office. [Late 1500s]
4. Succeed in including, delivering, or finishing something, as in Can you get in that last paragraph? or I hope you'll get it in on time. Also see get in with.
See also: get

get in

v.
1. To enter something: Please get in the back seat. We opened the door of the car and got in.
2. To arrive: He got in late last night.
3. To become accepted to some institution, such as a school or club: I applied to cooking school and, fortunately, I got in.
4. To cause someone or something to come to or be admitted to a place: Please get the children in before noon. The standards of the school are high, but your good grades will get you in.
5. To succeed in making or doing something within a restricted period of time: The milk truck got six deliveries in before noon. The postal carrier got in the entire route before 2:00.
6. To attain some condition, especially unwittingly: The hooligans got in trouble for disrupting the picnic.
7. To put something into some condition: We got the car in good condition for the long trip. The runner got in great shape for the marathon.
8. get in on To gain access to or knowledge of something: At the dance club, we got in on the latest dance moves. Everybody wanted to get in on the secret.
9. get in with To become involved with something, especially with some group: She got in with a bad group of people.
See also: get
References in periodicals archive ?
Traditional managed care brought many positive things to the health-care industry over the past three decades, including improved quality of care and reduced costs, Domaszewicz said.
The managed service provider receives an alarm when service quality drops or any piece of the system fails.
Entrepreneurs who own their own firms must operate investment banks that have managed more than $25 billion in total issues, asset management firms with at least $2 billion under management, or be identified as a leading firm that engages in unique or complex transactions.
This means there will be a need for sustained engagement between managed care and health-care epidemiologists.
California enacted legislation authorizing the use of a managed self-audit program in 1998.
Where employers are not the major payers, as in care for the elderly, cost containment and managed care appear to create higher costs and less patient satisfaction.
But their use as a means of purchasing health care will continue to play an ineffective role unless managed care begins to learn how competitive price systems actually function in every other legitimate marketplace.
A third feature of managed care plans is the establishment of medical networks and associations such as HMOs, PPAs, and IPOs.
We believe the whole concept of managed care is spurious,'' said Dr.
Teaming up with Level Platforms is a great step forward, showing the commitment StorageCraft has to managed service providers," said Mike Kunz, senior director of MSP sales at StorageCraft.
I've also heard that the advent of managed care has forced a change in the way offices operate.
As the millennium approaches, the prophesied wave of pure managed care has lost much of its early momentum.
And the operative word here is "risk," just as it is in managed care.
Managed care is the financing and delivery of medical care that is manifested through contracts with selected physicians and hospitals who provide comprehensive services to enrolled members.
Buyers of managed information technology (IT) services will focus on security, storage and disaster recovery services in 2007, new research commissioned by the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) reveals.