man alive


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man alive

An expression of surprise or pleasure. The phrase most likely arose as an alternative to something stronger, such as “Good lord!” which would have been acceptable to those people who objected to taking the deity's name in vain.
See also: alive, man
References in classic literature ?
I should say that you were the happiest man alive at this instant.
I believe you fully; I would trust you before any man alive, ay, before myself, if I could make the choice; but indeed it isn't what you fancy; it is not as bad as that; and just to put your good heart at rest, I will tell you one thing: the moment I choose, I can be rid of Mr.
As the faithful friend and servant of your family, I tell you, at parting, that no daughter of mine should be married to any man alive under such a settlement as you are forcing me to make for Miss Fairlie.
After some time he recovered himself a little, and from that time became the most humble, the most modest, and most importunate man alive in his courtship.
Why, not a cruel man, exactly, but a man of leather,--a man alive to nothing but trade and profit,--cool, and unhesitating, and unrelenting, as death and the grave.
Yet the three were often to be found together, and it was Goldsmith who said of Johnson, "No man alive has a more tender heart.
How many it had cost in the amassing, what blood and sorrow, what good ships scuttled on the deep, what brave men walking the plank blindfold, what shot of cannon, what shame and lies and cruelty, perhaps no man alive could tell.
Say the word, and Bob will have on his back the happiest man alive.
It seemed hardly the face of a man alive, with such a death-like hue: it was hardly a man with life in him, that tottered on his path so nervously, yet tottered, and did not fall!
Why, man alive, she was the admiration of the whole Court
It is no great boast, but I believe I was a better hand at worming out a story than either of my fellows at the George; and perhaps there is now no other man alive who could narrate to you the following foul and unnatural events.
There is scarcely any man alive who does not think himself meritorious for giving his neighbour five pounds.
McCarthy was the only man alive who had known dad in the old days in Victoria.
He had brought one man alive to land, and was on his way back to the vessel, when two heavy seas, following in close succession, dashed him against the rocks.
The coroner frequents more public-houses than any man alive.