make up for lost time

make up for lost time

to catch up; to go fast to balance a period of going slow or not moving. We drove as fast as we could, trying to make up for lost time. Hurry. We have to make up for lost time.
See also: lost, make, time, up

make up for lost time

to do as much as possible that you were not able to do before Ms Wesley published her first novel when she was 70 and quickly made up for lost time by writing nine more.
See also: lost, make, time, up

make up for lost time

to spend a lot of time doing something because you did not have the opportunity to do it previously I didn't travel much as a young adult but I'm certainly making up for lost time now.
See also: lost, make, time, up

make up for lost time

Also, make up ground. Hurry to compensate for wasted time, as in They married late but hoped to make up for lost time, or We're behind in the schedule, and we'll just have to make up ground as best we can. The first term was first recorded in 1774; the variant dates from the late 1800s.
See also: lost, make, time, up