make out


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make out (with someone or something)

 
1. to manage to do something with someone or something. I think I can make out with this hammer. If I can't make out with a crew of four, I'll have to ask for more help.
2. Go to make out (with someone).
See also: make, out

make out

 (with someone or something)
1. to manage to do something with someone or something. I think I can make out with this hammer. If I can't make out with a crew of four, I'll have to ask for more help.
2. Go to make out (with someone).
See also: make, out

make something out

to see, read, or hear something well enough to understand it. What did you say? I couldn't quite make it out. Can you make out what he is saying?
See also: make, out

make out

1. to achieve a particular level of success I know you've just started college and I wondered how you are making out. It was hard at first, but now I'm making out OK.
2. (slang) to kiss and touch someone in a sexual way Esther was making out with her boyfriend in the library the other day.
See also: make, out

make out somebody

also make somebody out
to see someone It was getting dark, but I could make out two people in the distance.
See also: make, out

make out something

also make something out
1. to hear or understand something With all the traffic noise, I couldn't make out a single word she said.
2. to write information on a form or document I just made out my application for a new credit card.
See also: make, out

make out

1. Discern or see, especially with difficulty, as in I can hardly make out the number on the door. [Mid-1700s]
2. Manage, get along, as in How did you make out with the accountant? This usage was first recorded in 1820.
3. Engage in sexual foreplay or intercourse, as in Bill and Jane were making out on the sofa, or Joe bragged that he made out last night. [Slang; early 1900s]
4. Understand, as in I can't make out what she is trying to say. [Mid-1600s] Also see can't make head or tail of.
5. Establish or prove, as in He made out that he was innocent. [Colloquial; mid-1600s]
6. Imply or suggest. This usage often occurs with an infinitive, as in Are you making me out to be a liar? [Colloquial; mid-1600s]
7. Write out, draw up; fill in a written form. For example, He made out the invoices, or Jane started making out job applications. This usage was first recorded in 1465.
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make out

v.
1. To discern or see something, especially with difficulty: It was hard to make out the traffic signs because of the rain. The patient tried to read the doctor's handwriting, but couldn't make it out.
2. To hear something well enough to understand it: He simply could not make out what she said. The voice over the public address system was so garbled that I couldn't make it out.
3. To write something out; draw something up: The shopkeeper stayed late to make out the invoices. We drew up a guest list so we could make the invitations out.
4. To represent or describe someone or something as being or doing something. Used with an infinitive clause: Their inaccurate description made me out to be a liar. The commercial made out the candidate to be a real hero.
5. To try to establish or prove that something is true: We made out that we were innocent.
6. To get along in some way; fare in some way: The family made out well in their business.
7. make out of To create or fashion something from something else: We made a birdcage out of the leftover wood. The jewelry was made out of copper.
8. Slang To kiss deeply and passionately; neck: The couple made out in the back seat of the car.
9. Vulgar Slang To have sexual intercourse.
See also: make, out

make out

1. in. to neck and pet. He started making out when he was twelve.
2. in. to succeed. How did you make out?
See also: make, out