make bail


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make bail

To have enough money to pay as a security that allows one to be released from prison until one appears in court before their trial. Thankfully I was able to make bail, because having to spend three months in jail just to try and prove I'm innocent would be horrible.
See also: bail, make

make bail

Put up security as an assurance that someone released from prison will appear for trial, as in He didn't think he could make bail for his brother. The use of bail for "security" was first recorded in 1495.
See also: bail, make

make bail

To secure enough money or property to pay the amount of one's bail.
See also: bail, make
References in periodicals archive ?
with money or other liquid assets will he most able to make bail,
GOTTFREDSON, POLICY GUIDELINES FOR BAIL: AN EXPERIMENT IN REFORM 21 (1985); WALKER, supra note 125, at 66 (describing as a "major institutional innovation" the creation of "pretrial services agencies with staff who would interview arrestees, obtain the necessary information on their background, attempt to verify the information, and make bail recommendations to the judge," and noting that "many used a formal point system").
Generally speaking, the more serious the offence the less likely it is the suspect will make bail.
Similarly, prosecutors generally make bail arguments based solely on the charging documents and the past criminal record of the accused.
Day asked Judge Art Gutierrez to revoke Luster's $1 million bail, saying that two of Luster's alleged victims are ``terrified'' he will use the family fortune to make bail and retaliate against them.
Even for stalking suspects who do make bail, the new requirement will make it more difficult to raise bail, thus giving stalking victims more time to relocate, she added.