make


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Related to make: make money

make

 (an amount of) headway
1. Lit. to move forward. Even in a light wind, the ship could not make any headway.
2. Fig. to advance toward completing a task. With the help of Garret, Christopher made a lot of headway on the project.

make someone

Sl. to identify someone. (Used especially in the context of law enforcement.) The cop stared at Wilbur and tried to make him, but failed to identify him and let him go. The cops took the suspect downtown where the police chief made him as a wanted criminal.

make something

to attend an event. I hope you can make our party. I am sorry, but I won't be able to make it.

make

1. tv. to identify someone. (Underworld.) We tried to make him down at the station but came up with nothing.
2. n. an identification. (Underworld.) We ran a make on her. She’s got two priors.
3. tv. to arrive at a place; to cover a distance. We made forty miles in thirty minutes.
4. tv. to achieve a specific speed. This buggy will make twice the speed of the old one.

make

/a mock of
To subject to ridicule; mock.

make

/go the rounds
1. To go from place to place, as on business or for entertainment: a delivery truck making the rounds; students going the rounds in the entertainment district.
2. To be communicated or passed from person to person: The news quickly made the rounds. A piece of juicy gossip is going the rounds.

make

/raise a stink Slang
To make a great fuss.
See:
References in classic literature ?
I shall myself give him this golden goblet--which is of exquisite workmanship--that he may be reminded of me for the rest of his life whenever he makes a drink offering to Jove, or to any of the gods.
And, because money was cheap to make, a number of men began to make money out of shell themselves.
And thereafter he worked no more, for he talked secretly with Dog-Tooth and Big-Fat and the other masters, and it was agreed that he should be the only one to make fire-brew.
It will save buying, and you can go to your stock any time and make over what you want.
You need n't save any old silk gowns for me; I don't mean to be a fine lady when I grow up, I 'm going to be a farmer's wife, and make butter and cheese, and have ten children, and raise pigs," she added in one enthusiastic burst.
I'll give it to him, make your mind easy about that," said Charlie, with an ominous doubling up of his fist.
fusca, which they habitually make into slaves, from those of the little and furious F.
I determined to make him my deputy and a confederate in my schemes of benevolence.
Think how he felt when, upon searching for them, he discovered that he had forgotten to make them!
It was necessary for me to reconstruct the occurrence and make of it two phases--each separated from the other, in time, by the space of several hours.
It seemed to make an extraordinary noise, too -- to give heavy thumps as though it had been as big as a bridge girder.
I now began to consider that I might yet get a great many things out of the ship which would be useful to me, and particularly some of the rigging and sails, and such other things as might come to land; and I resolved to make another voyage on board the vessel, if possible.
When they were thus disarmed, and found they had made all the Spaniards their enemies, as well as their own countrymen, they began to cool, and giving the Spaniards better words, would have their arms again; but the Spaniards, considering the feud that was between them and the other two Englishmen, and that it would be the best method they could take to keep them from killing one another, told them they would do them no harm, and if they would live peaceably, they would be very willing to assist and associate with them as they did before; but that they could not think of giving them their arms again, while they appeared so resolved to do mischief with them to their own countrymen, and had even threatened them all to make them their servants.
All manner of incidents combined in favour of the occasion: not only had Mr and Mrs Garland forewarned him that they intended to make no deduction for his outfit from the great amount, but to pay it him unbroken in all its gigantic grandeur; not only had the unknown gentleman increased the stock by the sum of five shillings, which was a perfect god-send and in itself a fortune; not only had these things come to pass which nobody could have calculated upon, or in their wildest dreams have hoped; but it was Barbara's quarter too--Barbara's quarter, that very day--and Barbara had a half-holiday as well as Kit, and Barbara's mother was going to make one of the party, and to take tea with Kit's mother, and cultivate her acquaintance.
That sort of thing makes me sick," he said roughly.