mail

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carry the mail (for someone)

To work assiduously, especially in a central role of some difficult or demanding task. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. With their captain out with an injury, it's up to their young star player to carry the mail for the team in this game. The boss carried the mail himself to make sure this project was completed on time.
See also: carry, mail

the check is in the mail

Payment (whether or not in the form of a check) is en route or will be sent shortly. Often used as an excuse to avoid the pressure of creditors or someone expecting payment. Primarily heard in US. A: "Mr. Smith, your mortgage payment is now two months overdue." B: "The check's in the mail, I promise you!" A: "Can you lend me $40 until I get paid next week?" B: "Sure thing, the check's in the mail."
See also: check, mail

cheque is in the mail

Payment (whether or not in the form of a cheque) is en route or will be sent shortly. Often used as an excuse to avoid the pressure of creditors or someone expecting payment for goods or services. Primarily heard in UK, Canada. A: "Mr. Smith, your mortgage payment is now two months overdue." B: "The cheque's in the mail, I promise you!" A: "Can you lend me $40 until I get paid next week?" B: "Sure thing, the cheque's in the mail."
See also: cheque, mail

mail (something) in

1. Literally, to send something somewhere or to someone by mail. I mailed in the application months ago, but I still haven't heard from the university!
2. To perform a given task, duty, or activity with little or no attention, effort, or interest; to do something perfunctorily. Usually such a key player on the field, the team's star running back seems to be mailing it in this afternoon. I usually love his work in film, but he totally mailed in his performance for this voice-over role.
See also: mail

by return mail

Through mail correspondence back to the sender. Please indicate your interest in this offer by return mail.
See also: mail, return

snail mail

Paper mail sent through the postal service (as opposed to email). A: "Did we get any exciting snail mail today?" B: "Nah, just some bills."
See also: mail, snail

by return mail and by return post

by a subsequent mailing (back to the sender). (A phrase indicating that an answer is expected very soon, by mail.) Since this bill is overdue, would you kindly send us your check by return mail? I answered your request by return post over a year ago. Please check your records.
See also: and, mail, post, return

junk mail

annoying, unsolicited mail, such as promotional letters, etc. I am so incredibly tired of getting pound after pound of junk mail every day. I could just scream.
See also: junk, mail

mail something from some place

to send something by mail from a particular place. I mailed the check from my office. I will mail it from the main post office.
See also: mail, place

mail something to someone

to send something to someone by mail. I mailed the check to you yesterday. I mailed a gift to my niece.
See also: mail

junk mail

Third-class mail, such as unsolicited advertisements and flyers, that is sent indiscriminately. For example, While we were on vacation the front hall filled up with junk mail. [c. 1950]
See also: junk, mail

snail mail

Ordinary postal service, as opposed to electronic communications. For example, He hasn't taken to his computer so he's still using snail mail. This slangy idiom, alluding to the alleged slowness of the snail, caught on at least partly for its rhyme. [1980s]
See also: mail, snail

knee-mail

n. prayer. (A message delivered on one’s knees.) You’d better be sending some knee-mail on this problem.

mail

n. money. The bills are due. I need some mail.

snail-mail

n. post office mail; regular mail as opposed to electronic mail. (Refers to the slowness of regular mail in comparison to electronic mail or faxes.) There are lots of color pictures in the article, so I will send you the original by snail-mail.
References in classic literature ?
He was dressed as a mail guard, with a wig on his head and most enormous cuffs to his coat, and had a lantern in one hand, and a huge blunderbuss in the other, which he was going to stow away in his little arm-chest.
This," said the guard, pointing to an old-fashioned Edinburgh and London mail, which had the steps down and the door open.
Well," said my uncle, as he looked about him, "a mail travelling at the rate of six miles and a half an hour, and stopping for an indefinite time at such a hole as this, is rather an irregular sort of proceeding, I fancy.
The figures of a horse and rider came slowly through the eddying mist, and came to the side of the mail, where the passenger stood.
After standing with the bridle over his heavily-splashed arm, until the wheels of the mail were no longer within hearing and the night was quite still again, he turned to walk down the hill.
Fortunately, there came, in almost the same mail with Bell's letter, another letter from a young Bostonian named Francis Blake, with the good news that he had invented a transmitter as satisfactory as Edison's, and that he would prefer to sell it for stock instead of cash.
The Antwerp Night Mail makes her signal and rises between two racing clouds far to port, her flanks blood-red in the glare of Sheerness Double Light.
I bet five hundred that sixty days from now I pull up at the Tivoli door with the Dyea mail.
On it, lashed with thongs of moose-hide, were the light canvas bags that contained the mail, and the food and gear for dogs and men.
And as promptly, on the 1st of October, going over the morning mail, we read the following:
Bute had a comfortable hot toast and tea; and as there was a vacant room in the house now, there was no need for her to remain at the Gloster Coffee House where the Portsmouth mail had set her down, and whence she ordered Mr.
Bute Crawley had come up from Hampshire by the mail, was staying at the Gloster, sent her love to Miss Crawley, and asked for breakfast with Miss Briggs.
It so happened that my first check had just arrived by the eight o'clock post; and my position should be appreciated when I say that I had to cash it to obtain a Daily Mail.
I--I've come about his advertisement in the Daily Mail.
I now learnt that the telegram had been posted, with the hour marked for its despatch, at the pillar nearest Vere Street, on the night before the advertisement was due to appear in the Daily Mail.