lust


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Related to lust: Seven deadly sins

lust for life

Intense eagerness to experience all that life has to offer. I don't mind growing old, but I sometimes miss that boundless lust for life I had when I was younger. My 80-year-old grandfather has a lust for life that continues to amaze us all!
See also: life, lust

lust for power

Intense, insatiable desire to attain power and control. My brother's lust for power in our company has created some deep and bitter divisions between him and the rest of the family.
See also: lust, power

flame with anger

 and flame with resentment; flame with lust; flame with vengeance
Fig. [for someone's eyes] to "blaze" or seem to communicate a particular quality or excitement, usually a negative feeling. His eyes flamed with resentment when he heard Sally's good news. Her eyes flamed with hatred.
See also: anger, flame

lust after someone

 and lust for someone
to desire someone sexually. You could see that Sam was lusting after Sally. Roger claims that he does not lust for anyone.
See also: after, lust

lust for something

Fig. to desire something. He says he lusts for a nice cold can of beer. Mary lusts for rich and fattening ice cream.
See also: lust

lust after

v.
1. To desire someone sexually: My college roommate lusts after the resident assistant.
2. To have an overwhelming desire or craving for something: I lust after chocolate, and I'm always snacking on fudge.
See also: after, lust
References in periodicals archive ?
In Experiment 1, we examined our hypothesis that individuals who are primed with love will show a higher level of self-control compared to those primed with lust.
Lust says that physical therapy procedures have proved to be helpful in some arthritic animals, although, he notes, "these treatments will be effective only if they are well controlled and are done consistently.
However, the word lust actually appears in LotR and Tolkien's other works.
Where do adolescents frequently get messages about love, lust, and infatuation?
The point is to sell things, and the inevitable outcomes--objectification of women, sexualization of children, increased pairing of sexuality with violence, the weakening of sexuality's power to bond, disillusionment of encountering real bodies where the airbrushed ones are expected to be--are all collateral damage that do not concern the peddlers of lust.
And as we meet the department--the secretary (a Muslim who feels the erotic pull of the new teacher), the wizened department chair (a practicing Buddhist whose powerful meditative sessions cause such palpitations that he tells colleagues he has the onset of Parkinson's), a formidable professor certain that he is a Satan, or at least capable of assuming the appropriate satanic shapes--Eisenstein gathers a collage of voices, each stunned by lust and yet hungry for confirmation that we must surely be more than dust and lust, that somehow we defy the sorry evidence of our fleshy casings, the deep-sea slug of the title.
There are two remarkable things about "Love & Lust," aside from the specifics of Ferrato's photography.
In Australia, the company's ice cream sales have risen, with vanity already sold out and lust well on the way, B&T Marketing and Media analysts reported.
I thought for a moment and then said, "I love you and I lust for you.
Very briefly, their general conclusions here are that in the high Middle Ages, wonder, a species of fear, was the proper attitude of humble Christians to God's inscrutable creation, and curiosity was a species of concupiscence akin to lust, both views received from Augustine.
Religious considerations aside, does misdirected lust matter?
Currently, the EPA gives the states about $55 million a year, money which comes from the LUST Trust Fund, which is funded by a tax on petroleum.
Today, we describe serial killers and other criminals as "animals" or "beasts" when we want to describe their lust, cruelty or senseless violence -- all behaviors that are, nature writer John Rodman notes, "more frequently observed on the part of men than of beasts.
Whereas Lust seeks the meaning of a Greek word that the original translator had in mind, Muraoka attempts to find what it meant to a reader `in the last few centuries before the turn of the era' (p.
Luce Professor of American Culture and Public Policy at Northwestern University, is a keen observer of lust and sin.