low life


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low life

People or activities that are regarded as contemptible or criminal. Often related to lower social classes. I grew up in poverty and was well-acquainted with our city's low life back then.
See also: life, low

low-life

1. n. a low person; a repellent person. This low-life smells like bacon.
2. mod. mean; belligerent. We don’t need any low-life characters around here.
References in periodicals archive ?
When this low life is caught he should get life behind bars but this will not happen.
Without dynamic seal, the PCM Delasco[TM] pumps combine performances, food safety and low life cycle costs.
99) THE journalist has compiled some of the Low Life columns he has written for the Spectator in this new collection.
Mr Rudd backed Ms Grimshaw, saying: "All I could describe his remarks as reflecting is a new form of low life.
We have every confidence the Gardai will nail the low life who committed this heinous crime.
The victim was low life Royce Stewart who got away with the rape and murder of Kamareia, the daughter of a Hennepin County, Minnesota sheriff officer, on a technicality.
Dope, Fatso, Hobo, Hooker, Idiot, Low Life, Loser, Poor White Trash, Roach, Slime Ball, Slime, Stupid and Tramp - all names you'd come to expect on the back of a Raiders fan's jersey - won't be tolerated, you imbecile.
The low life (of low lives) who committed this crime must be bought to justice and all credit to our local police force for keeping this case active.
Phase three of TPM is to ensure that all new equipment is specified, procured, installed and operated to achieve a defined level of high performance and, most importantly, low life cycle costs.
I say let the low life crawl in the gutter where he belongs and to my brother Steve I say, keep fighting boy.
ABS is a well recognized for its know-how in applications and cost-effective solutions for pumps, mixers and aerators with a strong focus on low Life Cycle Cost.
Executives said they also offer four rotary lobe designs, intermittent dry run capabilities, positive displacement metered flow and low life cycle costs.
In his book Low Life (1991), Luc Sante describes New York in the years from 1840 through 1919 as a city alternating between morally liberal and reformist mayors.
One might see this as a study of low life in the terms of high culture.
There was a clear middle-class taste for tales of low life, which showed both in the sensationalism of newspapers and in popular literature.